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Oklahoma football: How fast-paced offenses change expectations for defense

College football teams across the Big 12 — and the country — are playing faster than ever, causing defensive stalwarts like Mike Stoops to reconsider expectations.
by Jason Kersey Published: August 10, 2013
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photo - Oklahoma defensive coordinator Mike Stoops shouts during the college football game between the University of Oklahoma Sooners (OU) and the Kansas Jayhawks (KU) at Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman, Okla., Saturday, Oct. 20, 2012. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman
Oklahoma defensive coordinator Mike Stoops shouts during the college football game between the University of Oklahoma Sooners (OU) and the Kansas Jayhawks (KU) at Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman, Okla., Saturday, Oct. 20, 2012. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

NORMAN — In the age of fast-paced, no-huddle offenses that produce record point and yardage totals, what does great defense look like?

College football teams across the Big 12 — and the country — are playing faster than ever, causing defensive stalwarts like Mike Stoops to reconsider expectations.

“Winning is the most important thing to us, playing good enough defense to win,” said the OU defensive coordinator. “We want to dominate. That's out the window.

“We have to be rational in what we expect from our players. Our expectations will be to play great defense. We're not gonna change that. Numbers aren't relevant. You have to look at the totality of what we're trying to do. … We're not good enough to just line up and maul people. And nobody really is anymore in this league.”

The Sooners' offense went no-huddle five years ago in 2008, and has run the system with loads of success. Sam Bradford won the Heisman Trophy and OU played for the national championship that year.

Over the next four seasons, quarterback Landry Jones broke virtually every passing record in school history and led the Sooners to a pair of Big 12 Championships.

Still, as these offenses have evolved into more sophisticated — and even faster — machines, it's had an undeniable impact on defense in college football.

When offenses rush to the line of scrimmage after a play, the defense rarely has time to make adjustments or substitute players.

A wide receiver can run a 50-yard route, quickly slip off the field and be replaced by a fresh substitute, while the defender covering that receiver has to sprint back upfield before the next snap.

Prominent, successful head coaches like Alabama's Nick Saban and Arkansas' Bret Bielema have criticized such offenses as unfair to defenses and potentially dangerous for players' health.

“I really thought Nick Saban had a great quote in saying that football wasn't meant to be played like basketball,” Stoops said. “But I mean really that's what the game is. I would like to see the referees, you know what I mean, handle the pace of the game.”

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by Jason Kersey
OU Sports Reporter
Jason Kersey became The Oklahoman's OU football beat writer in May 2012 after a year covering high school sports and OSU recruiting. Before joining the newspaper in November 2006 as a part-time results clerk, he covered high school football for...
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