Huckabee's comments on birth control gift for Dems

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 24, 2014 at 10:34 am •  Published: January 24, 2014
Advertisement
;

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mike Huckabee's comments about contraception proved quick fodder for Democrats and a headache for Republicans trying to market themselves as a better choice for female voters who have proved elusive to the GOP.

The former Arkansas governor and potential presidential contender told fellow Republicans on Thursday that Democrats were trying to win over female voters by promising them birth control and telling them they cannot manage "their libido or their reproductive system without the help of the government."

The comments came as the Republican National Committee is working to soften its image among women, who favored President Barack Obama's re-election in 2012 by a 55 percent to 44 percent margin over GOP nominee Mitt Romney.

"Mike Huckabee has no idea what he's talking about," Democratic National Committee chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz said. "If this is the GOP rebrand a year later, then all they've gotten is a year older."

Asked about Huckabee's comments, press secretary Jay Carney told reporters at the White House that it "sounds offensive to me and to women."

In Kentucky, Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes' campaign sought to paint her Republican rival, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, as in lockstep with Huckabee.

"Mitch McConnell's cringe-worthy record of standing up for Kentucky's women and families effortlessly aligns with Mike Huckabee's extreme, anti-woman rhetoric," Grimes' campaign said in a statement. "As McConnell enthusiastically touts Huckabee's endorsement, he ought to explain to the women of Kentucky why he embraces such offensive commentary."

And the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee criticized GOP candidates in Arkansas, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia for accepting donations from Huckabee. In Arkansas, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee criticized GOP hopeful Tom Cotton: "It's a shame Republicans like Cotton and Huckabee want to push divisive social issues that would roll back women's health care rights instead of focusing on growing the economy and creating jobs."

The whole episode started during Thursday's luncheon at the Republican National Committee's meeting in Washington. Huckabee, who is considering a run for the White House, urged the GOP to broaden its appeal and end its internal divisiveness.

Continue reading this story on the...