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Hungry, Anyone?

llett Published: May 27, 2013
Seasonal Fruit of Bangladesh
Seasonal Fruit of Bangladesh
I had no idea what the food was going to be like in Bangladesh. It’s between India in South Asia. I had read that the food was spicy and used a lot of curry. I didn’t know how much I’d be eating in Dhaka. I thought it might not be the entertainment it is in America where we go out to eat and enjoy large portions.

The first night in Dhaka we ate at a buffet. The food had both a Chinese and Indian influence. You could eat fried rice with tandoori and rice pudding or Chhanar Mithai for dessert. The latter dessert is like a crispier version of a funnel cake and it has a sugar syrup in the center. It’s amazing. I’m definitely going to miss it. The next few meals were also buffets, and I soon discovered Bangladeshi people love their food. We were served some sort of biscuit or cookie with tea at every office meeting we went to. Bangladesh gets a lot of their culture from the British, so tea is a big staple. Bottled water is common anywhere you go within Dhaka, and juice is common with meals whether it’s papaya, mango, orange or pineapple. Alcohol is rarely served.

One of my favorite food items is called Dosa. It’s a South Indian cuisine. It’s a large paper thin crepe made out of lentils and rice batter and usually filled with some type of vegetable. The one I had was filled with greens and potatoes and served with a coconut yogurt sauce. I hope I can enjoy it again.

The Bangladeshi people are very proud of their seasonal fruits. We were told there is a month window to get the best mango, blackberries, lychee and jack fruit, and luckily, we are here for that sweet spot. Our liaison wanted to make sure we tried lychee so as we were driving (or just sitting in traffic), she opened the window and bought the fruit from a guy on the side of the street. In the van, we peeled the small juicy fruit and devoured it. Superb!