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In Oklahoma, an estimated 19,830 people will be diagnosed with cancer in 2014, the American Cancer Society says

The American Cancer Society estimates that among the Oklahomans diagnosed, 3,320 will have lung cancers; 2,570 will have prostate cancers; 2,700 will have breast cancers; and 1,760 will have colon cancers.
by Jaclyn Cosgrove Modified: February 5, 2014 at 11:00 am •  Published: February 4, 2014

An estimated 19,830 Oklahomans will be diagnosed with cancer and about 7,980 are expected to die from the disease in 2014, according to a recent American Cancer Society report.

Specifically, the American Cancer Society estimates that among the Oklahomans diagnosed, 3,320 will have lung cancers; 2,570 will have prostate cancers; 2,700 will have breast cancers; and 1,760 will have colon cancers.

An estimated 690 Oklahomans are expected to die from colon cancer, 510 people from breast cancer and 370 people from prostate cancer, according to the report.

“Two decades of steady declines in cancer death rates mean a person living in the U.S. today has about a 20 percent lower risk of dying from cancer than they did in 1990,” said John R. Seffrin, chief executive officer for the American Cancer Society, in a news release. “But there is much more to be done. All cancers caused by cigarette smoking could be prevented. Up to one-third of the cancer cases that occur in the U.S. are related to overweight or obesity, physical inactivity, and/or poor nutrition. We need to institute policies and public health programs that promote wellness and save lives.”

Cancer begins when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control, according to the organization.

In Oklahoma, all forms of cancer combined are the second leading cause of death, according to the state Health Department. Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among females, and colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death among both males and females, according to the agency.

Lack of access

Tia Yancey has worked in breast and cervical cancer screening programs at the Health Department for the past 14 years.

She helps administer Oklahoma Cares, a partnership of the Health Department and other state agencies and American Indian tribes.

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by Jaclyn Cosgrove
Medical and Health Reporter
Jaclyn Cosgrove writes about health, public policy and medicine in Oklahoma, among other topics. She is an Oklahoma State University graduate. Jaclyn grew up in the southeast region of the state and enjoys writing about rural Oklahoma. She is...
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