In remote Scotland, take a walk on the mild side

Published on NewsOK Modified: March 12, 2014 at 9:53 am •  Published: March 12, 2014
Advertisement
;

TARBERT, Scotland (AP) — I don't have much to tell you about Scotland, really. It's true, they have whisky, and kilts, and some people speak with an accent so thick that you wonder whether you're hearing English or Gaelic. All of that's fun. But I'm just here to tell you about the walks I took.

If you've heard anything about the weather in Scotland, you've heard the word "wet." Or perhaps "boggy." Or "ever-changing." These conditions make even more impressive the large collection of well-known footpaths that are the best way to explore the stunning countryside.

The most famous one is the West Highland Way, a 95-mile (150-kilometer) trail from the outskirts of Glasgow into the remote and moody Highlands. It ends shortly past the foot of the highest mountain in the UK, Ben Nevis, which can be walked up and down as a day hike, if you're fit. Near the summit, I saw small children and dogs.

The Way was my appetizer for more walks to come. I did its northern half, skipping the lowland part of the hike and heading straight into the landscape so heart-skippingly shown in the James Bond movie "Skyfall." It's easy; there are hotels or hostels at every stage, and even baggage transport service.

The single most useful tool for planning walks in Scotland is the popular website WalkHighlands.com. The site breaks down dozens of trails, with frank talk about muddy or risky conditions. It also links to that other essential tool, Ordnance Survey topographical maps.

And then there are the photos. WalkHighlands does what other trail guides don't: It shows what the scenery looks like at several different stages of each walk. Before leaving for Scotland, I spent hours clicking through trails and shopping for landscapes.

That's how I came across the path to a place called Rhenigidale.

It looked like a modest walk, just about 5 miles (8 kilometers) long, but the details that emerged made it more and more intriguing. It seemed the tiny seaside village in the string of islands called the Outer Hebrides had a hostel, one that didn't take advance bookings but rarely would turn anyone away, especially if they arrived on foot.

It seemed so remote, somehow so unlikely, that I emailed to make sure. The reply was prompt. "The hostel door is never closed," Peter Clarke, the chair of something called the Gatliff Hebridean Hostels Trust, replied. "You may put your overnight fees in cash, or by cheque, in the honesty box. If it is not in the hostel, the warden usually visits in the morning and early evening."

To this triple-locked Manhattan resident, it had the whiff of a fairy tale.

The next sign that I might be on to something came in an article by British author Robert Macfarlane, who has written movingly about nature and exploring it on foot. He called the winding old postman's path to Rhenigidale, its only land route to the outside world until a road was completed in 1989, "one of the most beautiful paths I know."

And once in Scotland, after finishing the West Highland Way and happily making day hikes around the Isle of Skye, I found that speaking of Rhenigidale could have a profound effect. One especially excited bus driver nearly ran off the road. A hostel manager beamed and confided, "No tourist has mentioned that for months!"



Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Tulsa police believe mother, teen son planned deaths together
  2. 2
    Kevin Durant asks for your basketball videos in Summer is Serious 2
  3. 3
    Big 12 basketball: Time, TV listing announced for Sooners' December game against Washington
  4. 4
    Lawsuit: 'Duck Dynasty' stole 'camo' idea
  5. 5
    Here's What Gaza Explosions Look Like From Space
+ show more