Inbee Park chasing history at US Women's Open

Published on NewsOK Modified: June 27, 2013 at 2:57 am •  Published: June 27, 2013
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SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Inbee Park might not be on the cusp of history if not for her struggles with her driving.

After winning the 2008 U.S. Women's Open, Park went more than four years before her next victory. She kept pushing her tee shots right, but she figures that's why her short game got so good.

It's carried her all the way to a No. 1 ranking. Park has won the first two majors of the year and her last two tournaments.

"I was just hitting it everywhere. I had to get it up and down from everywhere," Park said.

At this week's U.S. Women's Open at Sebonack Golf Club on Long Island, Park will seek to become the only player to win the first three majors of the year when there were at least four majors in a season.

She'll take on a course hosting its first major. Sebonack, designed by Jack Nicklaus and Tom Doak, opened in 2006 with views of the Great Peconic Bay. Its big bunkers and undulating greens offer a links-style challenge. The fairways are broad, but just landing the ball in them may not do much good; placement could be crucial.

"It feels like the last few U.S. Opens, it's all been how straight you can drive the ball, and that is kind of who has won the tournament," said second-ranked Stacy Lewis. "So I like this year that you don't have to drive it perfect off the tees, but you've got to play smart into the greens."

Park has relied on her clutch putting to win five times already this season and seven of her last 23 starts dating to last year. She suspects her strong short game was the one silver lining to her longtime struggles off the tee. She estimates she was missing nine or 10 greens per round, so she spent a lot of time trying to save par.

Her drives straightened out, Park has gone from saving pars to making birdies.

Some of her struggles were bad habits, but some of it was undoubtedly pressure. She remembers how she would spend much of Thursday and Friday worrying about whether she'd make the cut. If she hit a bad shot, she'd immediately start fretting about carding a bogey. After becoming the youngest U.S. Women's Open champ at age 19, she didn't win again until last July's Evian Masters.

"When you don't know how to handle the pressure, it's not a good feeling at all," she said. "Your heart's pumping; you think all the negative things."

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