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Interview and photos: National Geographic photographer and Oklahoma native Joel Sartore is building Photo Ark to save the animals

by Brandy McDonnell Published: August 10, 2014

Photographer Joel Sartore photographs a snake, an Abaco Island boa, for the Photo Ark project at the Oklahoma City Zoo on July 27. Photo by K.T. King, The Oklahoman
Photographer Joel Sartore photographs a snake, an Abaco Island boa, for the Photo Ark project at the Oklahoma City Zoo on July 27. Photo by K.T. King, The Oklahoman
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore recently photographed the American bison Mary Ann at the Oklahoma City Zoo, for his ongoing Photo Ark project. Through his Photo Ark, Sartore is trying to take portraits of every animal species in captivity. Photo provided
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore recently photographed the American bison Mary Ann at the Oklahoma City Zoo, for his ongoing Photo Ark project. Through his Photo Ark, Sartore is trying to take portraits of every animal species in captivity. Photo provided

A version of this story appears in the Sunday Life section of The Oklahoman.

National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore is building Photo Ark to save the animals
Ponca City native Joel Sartore recently returned to Oklahoma to take portraits of creatures at the Oklahoma City Zoo, Tulsa Zoo, University of Tulsa, WildCare sanctuary in Noble and Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Lawton as part of his ongoing mission to photograph every captive species in the world. His photo exhibition “Rare: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species” opens Sept. 13 at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in Norman.

Joel Sartore believes art can save the world.

One species at a time.

“I really care about things that we want to say are the least among us. The small things that nobody pays any attention to,” he said. “Freshwater mussels, I’ll photograph ‘em so that they look like they have faces. Whatever it takes. Why? Because 75 to 80 percent of our freshwater mussels in this country are threatened or endangered or functionally extinct. They’re in real trouble, and that indicates bad water quality, doesn’t it? And I drink water, and I care.”

Born in Ponca City, the esteemed photographer has been contributing to National Geographic for about 25 years. For the past nine, Sartore, 52, also has been building an ark, although not the wooden kind.

His Photo Ark is the largest collection of studio-quality animal portraits in the world – and he’s only about a third of the way to completing it. Sartore’s goal is to capture images of all 10,000 to 12,000 captive animal species on the planet, from tiny Salt Creek tiger beetles to massive Indian rhinoceroses. Not only does he want to give people a true picture, so to speak, of biodiversity, but he also wants to raise awareness of the number of species in peril.

“It’s a big deal to me because if we keep going the way we’re going – on the way to 10 billion people – we’re gonna run out. We’re gonna run out of land, we’re gonna run out of water, and we’re certainly gonna run out of habitat. That means that half of what you’re seeing – half of all species – could go to extinction by 2100,” he said during a recent talk with staff at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

“I figured the second half of my career, why not do something that sticks. Maybe.”

Acclaimed wildlife photographer and Ponca City native Joel Sartore took this portrait of various finches during his recent visit to the Tulsa Zoo. Through his Photo Ark, Sartore is trying to take portraits of every animal species in captivity. Photo provided by Joel Sartore
Acclaimed wildlife photographer and Ponca City native Joel Sartore took this portrait of various finches during his recent visit to the Tulsa Zoo. Through his Photo Ark, Sartore is trying to take portraits of every animal species in captivity. Photo provided by Joel Sartore

Winged inspiration

The longtime Nebraska resident’s dual interests in animals and photography began when he was a child and his mother got him a Time-Life picture book on birds. He was especially taken by the image of Martha, the last of the extinct passenger pigeon.

“The passenger pigeon numbered in the billions – billions of birds – flocks that would last three days flying 60 miles per hour, as Audubon described it. And we market-hunted them to extinction. This last bird died in 1914. Coming up September of this year will be the 100th anniversary. So, I never got over that and I never forgot that,” he said.

“I thought, ‘If we didn’t care about driving a pigeon to extinction when we knew that they were going, how are we ever gonna get somebody to care about an aquatic roly-poly bug the size of my pinky nail that lives there – last place, that pool of water, where somebody dumped a dead dog in it a couple of years ago and another guy parked a car over the top of it and set it on fire, outside of Socorro, New Mexico? How are we going to get people to behave?’”

He has especially been inspired by the art of renowned naturalist and painter John James Audubon, as well as the work of painter George Catlin and photographer Edward Curtis, who created portraits of American Indians in the 1800s and early 1900s before their culture could vanish.

When his wife, Kathy, was diagnosed with breast cancer nine years ago, the globe-trotting photographer stayed home for about a year while she went through chemotherapy. For the first time in his career, he couldn’t travel, and that gave him time to think about where he wanted to take his art.

“On the days when she felt better and the kids were in school, I would go down to the Lincoln Children’s Zoo and start taking pictures on black and white backgrounds. And I just did that until she got better again,” he said. “After a while, my editor at National Geographic, the natural history editor there, called and said, ‘What have you been doing?’ And I showed her some portraits, and she said, ‘Why don’t you do a story like that?’” he said.

“If you’re trying to make the point that every animal is worth saving, they all have a place, and they all deserve to exist, it’s hard to convey that unless you can have them all the same size. So the black and white backgrounds are a great equalizer. A snail is every bit as important and large as a grizzly bear.”

A boulder darter, photographed at Conservation Fisheries in Knoxville, Tenn., is featured in Joel Sartore’s book and exhibit “Rare: Portraits of America's Endangered Species.” The exhibit opens Sept. 13 at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural story in Norman. Photo provided
A boulder darter, photographed at Conservation Fisheries in Knoxville, Tenn., is featured in Joel Sartore’s book and exhibit “Rare: Portraits of America's Endangered Species.” The exhibit opens Sept. 13 at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural story in Norman. Photo provided

‘Rare’ portraits

The first story to rely on his new portrait style showcased the wide array of flora and fauna protected under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, from the California condor and the Nashville crayfish to the loggerhead sea turtle and the now-extinct Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit. The story spun off a 2010 photo book titled “Rare: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species,” as well as a traveling photography exhibition of the same name.

The exhibition will be on view Sept. 13 through Jan. 19 at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in Norman.
“The Sam Noble Museum is an institution dedicated to preserving and fostering biodiversity,” said Laura Wilcox, the museum’s publications and promotions specialist, in an email. “In doing so, the museum hopes to inspire understanding, appreciation and stewardship of the Earth. That’s what ‘Rare’ is all about.”

Esteemed National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore recently photographed Niki and Rupert, a mother-son Indian rhinoceros duo at the Oklahoma City Zoo, for his ongoing Photo Ark project. Photo provided
Esteemed National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore recently photographed Niki and Rupert, a mother-son Indian rhinoceros duo at the Oklahoma City Zoo, for his ongoing Photo Ark project. Photo provided

Ark additions

Sartore’s “Rare” book features at least three creatures he photographed in Oklahoma: a polar bear at the Tulsa Zoo, a bald eagle at Sutton Avian Research Center in Bartlesville and a lesser prairie chicken in Laverne.

He recently returned to his native state for about a week, taking portraits of birds like the black vulture and nighthawk at WildCare rehabilitation center in Noble, photographing an array of finches at the Tulsa Zoo, capturing images of the state bird, the scissor-tailed flycatcher, at the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge near Lawton, and documenting a newly discovered species of salamander at the University of Tulsa.

With his daughter Ellen, 17, assisting him, Sartore spent four days at the Oklahoma City Zoo, where he photographed at least 20 species, ranging from an American bison and African lungfish to a black-naped fruit dove and a black-headed cat snake.

He returned Friday to the OKC Zoo to shoot more animal portraits.

“For us, spending this kind of quality time with a world-renowned photographer who’s going to spread a message that’s so important… seems just like a dream come true. It’s just another chance to raise awareness,” said OKC Zoo spokeswoman Tara Henson.

West African lungfish (Protopterus annectens)
at the Oklahoma City Zoo.
West African lungfish (Protopterus annectens) at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

Continuing mission

Sartore has photographed nearly 4,000 captive animal species, meaning he’s almost a third of the way to achieving his goal of getting all of them on his Photo Ark.

“I photograph everything whether it’s common or rare because I don’t know what’s going to be around eventually. I just think, you know, it’s all interesting. People ask me what my favorite one is, and I say, ‘Well, it’s the next one. It’s the next one.’ And it really is true,” he said.

“Can we save species? A lot of people want to know that. Well, sure, you bet, But we’ve gotta know about them. That’s kind of the Ark’s point, to get people to care about animals. They can’t care about them if they don’t know about them.”

Acclaimed wildlife photographer and Ponca City native Joel Sartore took this portrait of a black-naped fruit dove at the Oklahoma City Zoo. Through his Photo Ark, Sartore is trying to take portraits of every animal species in captivity. Photo provided by Joel Sartore
Acclaimed wildlife photographer and Ponca City native Joel Sartore took this portrait of a black-naped fruit dove at the Oklahoma City Zoo. Through his Photo Ark, Sartore is trying to take portraits of every animal species in captivity. Photo provided by Joel Sartore

COMING SOON

Joel Sartore’s “Rare: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species”

When: Sept. 13-Jan. 19.

Where: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, 2401 Chautauqua Ave., Norman.

Information: 325-4712 or www.snomnh.ou.edu.

-BAM

by Brandy McDonnell
Entertainment Reporter
Brandy McDonnell, also known by her initials BAM, writes stories and reviews on movies, music, the arts and other aspects of entertainment. She is NewsOK’s top blogger: Her 4-year-old entertainment news blog, BAM’s Blog, has notched more than 1...
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