Share “IOC drops wrestling from 2020 Olympics”

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Modified: February 12, 2013 at 9:53 am •  Published: February 12, 2013

/articleid/3754604/1/pictures/1951483">Photo - Oklahoma State wrestling coach John Smith is pictured in 1988 after winning the gold medal at the 1988 Games in South Korea. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES PHOTO
Oklahoma State wrestling coach John Smith is pictured in 1988 after winning the gold medal at the 1988 Games in South Korea. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES PHOTO

Wrestling will now join seven other sports in applying for inclusion in 2020. The others are a combined bid from baseball and softball, karate, squash, roller sports, sport climbing, wakeboarding and wushu. They will be vying for a single opening in 2020.

The IOC executive board will meet in May in St. Petersburg, Russia, to decide which sport or sports to propose for 2020 inclusion. The final vote will be made at the IOC session, or general assembly, in September in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

It is extremely unlikely that wrestling would be voted back in so soon after being removed by the executive board.

“Today's decision is not final,” Adams said. “The session is sovereign and the session will make the final decision.”

The last sports removed from the Olympics were baseball and softball, voted out by the IOC in 2005 and off the program since the 2008 Beijing Games. Golf and rugby will be joining the program at the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Previously considered under the closest scrutiny was modern pentathlon, which has been on the Olympic program since the 1912 Stockholm Games. It was created by French baron Pierre de Coubertin, the founder of the modern Olympic movement, and combines fencing, horse riding, swimming, running and shooting.

Klaus Schormann, president of governing body UIPM, lobbied hard to protect his sport's Olympic status and it paid off in the end.

“We have promised things and we have delivered,” he said after Tuesday's decision. “That gives me a great feeling. It also gives me new energy to develop our sport further and never give up.”

Modern pentathlon also benefited from the work of Juan Antonio Samaranch Jr., the son of the former IOC president who is a UIPM vice president and member of the IOC board.

“We were considered weak in some of the scores in the program commission report but strong in others,” Samaranch told the AP. “We played our cards to the best of our ability and stressed the positives. Tradition is one of our strongest assets, but we are also a multi-sport discipline that produces very complete people.”


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