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Iowa rejects juvenile mandatory minimum sentences

Published on NewsOK Modified: July 18, 2014 at 3:57 pm •  Published: July 18, 2014
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DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The Iowa Supreme Court ruled Friday that juveniles cannot be given mandatory minimum sentences, making it the first state to interpret federal court directives that broadly.

More than 100 prisoners who as juvenile offenders were tried as adults and received mandatory minimum sentences before 2013 must be resentenced, the court said in a 4-3 ruling. The state law mandating that juvenile offenders who received a prison sentence with no opportunity for parole until a minimum time is served is unconstitutional, the court ruled.

"There is no authority from anywhere in the country that comes anywhere close to this," said Frank Bowman, a law professor at the University of Missouri School of Law. "Iowa is right out front on that one."

"Mandatory minimum sentences for juveniles are simply too punitive for what we know about juveniles," Chief Justice Mark Cady wrote, adding that constitutional protections for the rights of juveniles being sentenced for serious crimes are rapidly evolving. Iowa law allowed for mandatory minimums in a variety of crimes, including robbery, murder, kidnapping, sexual abuse and some vehicular homicides.

But two justices wrote critical dissenting opinions saying the court is taking recent U.S. Supreme Court guidance on juvenile sentences too far, and a state lawmaker agreed.

"This ruling perverts the constitution, puts Iowans in danger and makes our state less safe," Iowa House Judiciary Chairman Chip Baltimore, a Boone Republican, said in a statement.

In 2010, the nation's high court struck down life sentences for juveniles convicted of crimes other than murder, and in 2012 ruled that mandatory life sentences for juveniles violate the constitutional protection against cruel and unusual punishment. Judges were to consider many factors — such as including education, home life, maturity and culpability — when sentencing a juvenile, the high court said. The Iowa Legislature amended the state's law in 2013 to remove mandatory sentencing for juveniles in most cases.

Cady said Friday's ruling means that juveniles can be sentenced to long terms of imprisonment, but it cannot be mandatory.

California and Massachusetts lawmakers have modified sentences for juveniles, and it is likely many other state courts will follow Iowa's lead in coming years, according to Bryan Stevenson, the director of Equal Justice Initiative, a Montgomery, Alabama-based nonprofit law project. The Michigan Supreme Court last week ruled inmates convicted of murder as teens won't get new sentences.

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