Iraq War veteran has new Oklahoma career in machining

Moore Norman Technology Center's Precision Machining program has no trouble finding jobs for graduates.
BY DEBRA LEVY MARTINELLI Published: January 26, 2013
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As proof, Dwyer landed a job with Applied Industrial Machining in Oklahoma City after his return from Kansas City. He works primarily on oil field equipment, with projects varying widely in size, configuration and complexity.

If he has a part that is especially complex or difficult to machine, he is particularly satisfied when he makes a lot of them in one day.

“I take a lot of pride in work and am a little compulsive about details,” he said.

Key to his success, he says, is being familiar with every inch and quirk of his machine.

“It's very important to know your machine — how it changes during a shift, what it is ‘thinking.' If you switch to a different machine, you have to learn a whole new set of habits. A good machinist really is one with his machine.”

To get there, Dwyer offers this advice: “If you want to learn, your instructor will teach you everything you want to know. Be self-directed and apply yourself. The training you will get is too good an experience to squander. You will have an automatic career that is fun and challenging and you won't have crippling school debt.”

Precision machinists are in high demand.

“I have more jobs than students,” says Jones. “But most people outside manufacturing don't understand what we do. They take a part out of a box and don't realize how that part got to be. We made the part and we made the box. Without us, nothing else gets done.”

Debra Levy Martinelli is principal, LevyMart Public Relations.



If you want to learn, your instructor will teach you everything you want to know. ... The training you will get is too good an experience to squander.”

Steve Dwyer,

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