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Iraqi conflict leads to higher oil prices

Tensions are rising in Iraq again, and oil prices are going up as well. The common pattern is repeating itself again. The rapid increase in domestic oil production has helped minimize some of the typical effects, but oil is still a global commodity heavily influenced by geopolitical issues.
by Adam Wilmoth Modified: June 20, 2014 at 9:00 pm •  Published: June 19, 2014

Tensions are rising in Iraq again, and oil prices are heating up as well.

The common pattern is repeating itself again. The rapid increase in domestic oil production has helped minimize some of the typical effects, but oil is still a global commodity heavily influenced by geopolitical issues.

Global oil production last year was about 90.3 million barrels per day, while consumption was about 88.2 million barrels per day, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. That’s a very thin margin. Iraq has the fifth-largest proven oil reserve in the world and produced about 3 million barrels per day last year. If that oil is removed from the global market, there could be supply disruptions.

So far, most of the country’s oil producing and refineries have been unaffected. But oil is priced on the open market, which often jumps on fear and rumor.

The fear of instability and possible disruptions has caused an increase in the global price of oil, which is known as Brent Crude and is priced in London. Brent is the benchmark price, and it affects other oil and gasoline prices.

Brent closed at $114.91 Thursday, up from $108.61 on June 6. The longer the unrest continues, the more the price is likely to go up.

That’s the global picture.

Domestic production jumped to about 8.2 million barrels per day in March, up from 5 million barrels per day in 2008, and it continues to grow.

Largely because of the rapid boost in production in the central United States, West Texas Intermediate crude priced in Cushing has been trading at a discount to the international price. WTI closed at $106.62 Thursday.

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by Adam Wilmoth
Energy Editor
Adam Wilmoth returned to The Oklahoman as energy editor in 2012 after working for four years in public relations. He previously spent seven years as a business reporter at The Oklahoman, including five years covering the state's energy sector....
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