Deseret Digital Media NewsOK publishes content from Deseret Digital Media, which has a network of websites that includes KSL.com, DeseretNews.com and FamilyShare.com.

Is Twitter dying?

People aren't interacting as much over Twitter. Does that mean the social media platform is on its way out?
Herb Scribner, Deseret News Modified: May 1, 2014 at 3:42 pm •  Published: May 2, 2014
Advertisement
;

Has Twitter taken its last 140 character-long breath?

On Wednesday, April 30, The Atlantic’s Adrienne Lafrance and Robinson Meyer wrote a eulogy for the social media network, as it has begun to lose user interactions. To put it as they did, “Twitter is entering its twilight.”

Lafrance and Meyer wrote that it’s less about numbers and more about how culture overall is shifting. Like previous social apps before it, Twitter has begun to enter its final days because people just don’t seem into it anymore, according to Meyer and Lafrance.

“The publishing platform that carried us into the mobile Internet age is receding. Its influence on publishing will remain, but the platform's place in Internet culture is changing in a way that feels irreversible and echoes the tradition of AIM and pre-2005 blogging,” The Atlantic writers wrote. “A lot of this argument comes down to what we feel. Communities can't be fully measured by how many people are in them. So as we suss out cultural changes, relying on first-hand experience is a first step.”

And Wall Street recently downgraded Twitter’s stock, mostly because users aren’t finding it to be an easy app or social media platform to engage with, San Jose Mercury News reported.

"In short, we believe millions of consumers have sampled Twitter only to find a complex product with marginal relevance and value — a view we realize stands in sharp contrast to the fanatical loyalty the company enjoys among its core users," Wells Fargo analyst Peter Stabler said to the Mercury News.

But Slate’s Will Oremus thinks a lot of the downgrading and worry about Twitter is about how people perceive it — mainly in how analysts compare it to Facebook. Twitter, though, is nothing like the social network Facebook, Oremus wrote.