Islands want UN to see climate as security threat

Published on NewsOK Modified: February 16, 2013 at 2:31 am •  Published: February 16, 2013
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"Economically we know what to do, but politically it's going to take leadership," she said. "And every day we don't act we make the job more difficult for ourselves."

"What the Security Council has to do is understand that everything has to be seen through this lens. Climate change is changing the future scenarios for every country," Kyte said. "It's framing decisions on security, economic security, food security."

Germany's Deputy U.N. Ambassador Miguel Berger recalled that in July 2011, at his country's initiative, the Security Council discussed the security implications of climate change at a formal meeting and adopted a presidential statement expressing the council's concern about the possible adverse effects of climate change on international peace and security.

Berger told the council that Germany was happy to see the council taking up the issue again and stressed that all U.N. entities, including the Security Council, need to intensify their efforts to combat climate change and its security implications. He called for these implications to be included in Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's reports to the council on climate change.

"Let us not forget: Climate change and its security implications will shape tomorrow's world in a way that is almost impossible to overestimate," Wittig said. "We should also consider whether a U.N. special envoy on climate and security could help us to tackle the foreign and security policy implications of climate change."

Pakistan's U.N. Ambassador Masood Khan said the meeting would galvanize actions in all U.N. forums to combat climate change.

"Our response should not be anchored only in politics; it should also be guided by science and technology," Khan said. "Our response should not just counter immediate threats; it should forewarn and prepare us for the impending threats that impinge on our security."