'It's Gone. It's All Gone.' Residents Shaken By Twister's Fury

Clytie Bunyan Published: May 4, 1999
Advertisement
;

Charlotte Jeffries' oldest sister planned a trip to Oklahoma City on Wednesday. She was coming from Sacramento, Calif., to help her widowed sister prepared for a neighborhood garage sale next week.

But Monday evening, Jeffries' Eastlake Patio home was flattened, and she has nothing for sale.

"It's gone. It's all gone," she said, tearfully.

The neighborhood, in the area of SW 119 and Western, made up mostly of retired residents, is only about 7 years old.

Jeffries believes everyone she knows escaped alive, which she said is a miracle considering the rubble they crawled from after the tornado came through.

She and her cocker spaniel, Poppy, were rescued by neighbors about 15 minutes after the tornado hit.

With nowhere to go, nothing to drive and the scent of gas hanging in the air, she and Poppy walked away from the scene, heading for the nearest shelter.

Halfway to Graceway Baptist Church, a mile away, two women stopped to give her a ride.

Shaken, bruised and wet, Jeffries, the language coordinator for Moore schools, sat in the bleachers in the church's gymnasium, pondering what to do next.


NewsOK.com has disabled the comments for this article.

Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    College of Charleston president orders second investigation of Doug Wojcik
  2. 2
    Joe Paterno's son Jay sues Penn State for 'improper termination'
  3. 3
    Former Dallas Cowboys running back Robert Newhouse dead at 64
  4. 4
    Oklahoma man gets consecutive 20-year terms for rapes of intellectually challenged classmates
  5. 5
    Angels won't cap former OU pitcher Garrett Richards' innings
+ show more