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It's tough out there for a poor worker

Being poor and working isn't exactly a walk in the park. In fact, the recession still may not have left for impoverished workers.
Herb Scribner, Deseret News Modified: June 17, 2014 at 10:45 am •  Published: June 17, 2014
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It isn’t easy being a poor, working American.

For poor workers, the Great Recession that plagued the United States and affected most of the world’s economy is far from over for workers caught in poverty, according to The Daily Signal’s James Sherk.

A lot of it comes down to gaining skills, wrote Sherk. Employers have cut back on hours, and thus cut back on the amount of time that people can improve their ability to work.

“The more you play a sport or instrument, the better you get,” Sherk wrote. “It’s the same story with work: with more experience, workers become more productive and earn higher pay. Sadly, during the recession the length of the average workweek shortened.”

It’s not helping that Americans are accepting part-time jobs as the new normal, Sherk noted in another piece from The Daily Signal.

“Of course, employers usually reduce work hours in times of economic distress, then increase them once the crisis passes,” Sherk wrote. “That’s exactly what happened in the most recent recession … for workers in the middle three income quintiles. But the recovery never happened for workers in the bottom fifth of the wage distribution. Their hours fell and did not come back.”

A similar theme was touched on by Maria Konnikova in her piece for The New York Times. According to Konnikova, People are switching their schedules, causing them to have less time to get any work done.

As Americans try to juggle family, life and work, they’re finding themselves asking for extensions with work projects, which ultimately keeps them from being more productive, she wrote.