Jenni Carlson: From Oklahoma Christian School to NBA All-Star, Blake Griffin has made quite the rise

by Jenni Carlson Modified: February 22, 2011 at 10:52 am •  Published: February 21, 2011

Before Blake Griffin soared over a car and won the dunk contest, Cindy Prince knew him as the youngster who stopped by her classroom every day to give her a hug.

Before he put a beleaguered franchise on the NBA map like never before, Josh Gamblin knew him as the kid who became his friend at a time when he needed one most.

Before he took the league by storm like no one has since Dr. J, Gary Vick knew him as the teen who made one of his summer basketball coaches worry he wasn't tough enough.

Big Blake has made quite the rise.

On a night when the Clippers rookie returns to his hometown for his first game here as a pro, he has already become the NBA's most exciting young star. He has power. He has skill. He has charisma. People knew he was good — he was the first pick in the draft, for goodness sakes — but this good? Good enough to have the whole league buzzing about what he'll do next? Good enough to make people care about Clippers games? Good enough to make All-Star Weekend a three-day celebration of Blake?

There are plenty of folks in Oklahoma City who knew he was that good. They realized his potential. They recognized his greatness.

They were witness.

Josh Gamblin could see right away that Griffin was different than the rest of the players on their baseball team. Even though he was already a big kid — home runs were the norm — he was always working on his hitting, his pitching and his fielding.

He was 9.

“If he didn't do something well, he was going to keep working at it,” Gamblin said.

And if he happened to have a bad game?

Look out.

“He'd always bounce back,” Gamblin said.

But the thing that Gamblin remembers most from those early days was Griffin's friendship. Gamblin's family had moved from Omaha to Oklahoma City a few months before summer baseball started. He was the new kid, but it wasn't long before Gamblin and Griffin were best buds.

“He was always at my house,” Gamblin said, “or I was always at his.”

They are still tight more than a decade later. Even as Griffin went to Oklahoma Christian School, then to Oklahoma and Gamblin went to Putnam City North, then to Southwestern Christian University, they would talk on the phone and hang out whenever they could.

They don't see each other as often now — texts and tweets have become the favored method of communication — but Gamblin watches Griffin play as often as he can.

He couldn't be more proud.

“Blake was my friend before all of this,” he said. “If he wasn't playing basketball, he'd still be my friend.”

Not playing basketball?

That hardly seems possible now, but the man who oversees the state's most successful summer basketball program confesses some had their doubts about Griffin's staying power.

Gary Vick remembers having a conversation with one of his Athletes First coaches after a tournament in Lawton. Griffin had only been playing in the elite program for a year or so, but the coach was starting to wonder about him.

Tramel: Playing what if on Griffin

by Jenni Carlson
Columnist
Jenni Carlson, a sports columnist at The Oklahoman since 1999, came by her love of sports honestly. She grew up in a sports-loving family in Kansas. Her dad coached baseball and did color commentary on the radio for the high school football...
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