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Obama gets blame, but 2008 bill set procedures for dealing with young illegal immigrants

Fallin, Cole blame Obama, but they didn’t object when current procedures for dealing with young illegal immigrants passed Congress.
by Rick Green Published: June 29, 2014
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photo -  
                 The building where young illegal immigrants are housed is shown June 12 before their arrival last month at Fort Sill. The barracks eventually could house up to 1,200 young immigrants from Central America. 
                   PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN
The building where young illegal immigrants are housed is shown June 12 before their arrival last month at Fort Sill. The barracks eventually could house up to 1,200 young immigrants from Central America. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

Procedures for helping young unaccompanied illegal immigrants are based in part on legislation approved by Congress in 2008, yet some lawmakers who did not object to the measure then are against the procedures now.

Gov. Mary Fallin and Rep. Tom Cole, R-Moore, were members of the U.S. House when the bill passed without objection.

The William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 also passed the U.S. Senate by unanimous consent and was signed into law by President George W. Bush.

The act was mainly intended to help human trafficking victims, but one part had provisions for unaccompanied illegal immigrants under age 18.

The legislation said they must “be promptly placed in the least restrictive setting that is in the best interest of the child.” The U.S. Health and Human Services Department is to provide for their custody and care while deportation hearings are under way. The department is to attempt to find a parent or a sponsor in the United States while providing free legal representation and a child advocate.

Since October, more than 52,000 children from Central America have been apprehended, more than double the previous year. White House officials said that while they are often fleeing extreme violence and impoverished conditions in Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, they are also acting under the misinformation that once they arrive here they essentially get a free pass to stay. Purveyors of the misinformation are thought to include people making money by smuggling them across the border.

Cole said housing the young people with family members already in this country or through foster care is “de facto amnesty.”

“It would be far more appropriate to return those who have come to the country illegally to their country of origin as quickly and humanely as possible,” he said.

Fallin said a message of permissiveness has gone out to potential illegal immigrants.

“Basically we’ve told families, we’ve told children that if you want to come to the United States as an unaccompanied child, or a teenager, come on, that we’re basically going to give you amnesty here in America,” she said.

In a congressional hearing Tuesday, Rep. Mike McCaul, R-Texas, said the message needs to go out that these young people will be promptly sent home.

However, the 2008 act mandates the current, often lengthy, procedures under which the young people are given temporary housing and an array of services while a parent or sponsor is sought in the United States pending deportation hearings, which are often delayed because immigration courts are backed up with pending cases.

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by Rick Green
Capitol Bureau Chief
Rick Green is the Capitol Bureau Chief of The Oklahoman. A graduate of Humboldt State University in Arcata, Calif., he worked as news editor for The Associated Press in Oklahoma City before joining The Oklahoman.
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