Jury selection begins in Portland car bomb case

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 11, 2013 at 3:55 am •  Published: January 11, 2013
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Next, the case of Brandon Mayfield, an Oregon attorney erroneously linked to the 2004 Madrid train bombings after intense FBI surveillance yielded a false match to a fingerprint on a bag containing detonating devices.

The federal government formally apologized and reached a $2 million settlement with Mayfield. The next year, Portland cited civil rights concerns when it withdrew from an information-sharing task force that paired local police with the FBI, becoming the first major city to do so.

Most recently, a Muslim civil rights group demanded an investigation into the Portland FBI, who stopped two Oregon Muslims visiting the Middle East and questioned them about their religious beliefs.

Prospective jurors gave U.S. District Court Judge Garr King an earful Thursday morning as several of them said they could not be objective about the case.

"(Mohamud) would have had a very hard time doing this if it weren't for the FBI," one prospective male juror told King. "I don't agree with the prosecution, I don't agree with the way this was done."

That man was dismissed from jury duty, as was a woman who said she could see from the attorneys assembled that the prosecution had more power and money than Mohamud's defense team.

"I can see they have more resources than the defense," she said. "I have very strong ethical and philosophical feelings about this."

Others who complained about upcoming honeymoons, no-refund airfare to attend the presidential inauguration and a rabbi with two funerals scheduled for Friday were each told they had to stay.

Jury selection began with 85 people on Thursday, and is expected to last until at least the end of the week.



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