Kathleen Parker: Yes, we absolutely need men

BY KATHLEEN PARKER Published: June 3, 2013
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News that women increasingly are the leading or sole breadwinner in the American family has resurrected the perennial question: Why do we need men?

With each generation, the question becomes more declarative and querulous. Recent demographic shifts show women gaining supremacy across a spectrum of quantitative measures, including education and employment. Women outnumber men in college and in most graduate fields. Increasingly, owing in part to the recession and job loss in historically male-dominated fields, they are surpassing men as wage-earners, though women still lag at the highest income and executive levels.

My argument that men should be saved is that, despite certain imperfections, men are fundamentally good and are sort of pleasant to have around. Most women still like to fall in love with them; all children want a father no matter how often we try to persuade ourselves otherwise. If we continue to impose low expectations and negative messaging on men and boys, future women won't have much to choose from.

We are nearly there.

The Pew Research Center recently found that four in 10 American households with children under age 18 include a mother who is either the primary breadwinner or the sole earner. The latter category is largely owing to the surge in single-mother households.

This reflects “evolving family dynamics,” according to The New York Times. But what it really represents is a continuing erosion of the traditional family and, consequently, what is best for children and, therefore, future society.

Before you reach for the inhaler, permit me to introduce a few disclaimers. First, I'm all for women achieving all they can. Obviously, I'm on that treadmill myself. I've raised three children while working (mostly self-employed and briefly as a single mom).

Second, women have joined the workforce in greater numbers because they've had to. Children are expensive and one income seldom suffices. Thanks to the recession, many Americans count themselves lucky if even one member of the household has a job. And a single mother clearly has no other choice, though it is increasingly the case that women choose to be single parents as the biological clock runs down.

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