Keep color in mind when buying flowers for Mother's Day

Though many of Oklahoma's early bloomers, such as daffodils and tulips, already are past their primes, most florists carry fresh-cut stems of popular bulb varieties.
by Heather Warlick Published: May 6, 2013
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Mix delphinium, hydrangea, hyacinth and throw in a pop of magenta with Inca lilies, which will last for weeks, Anderson said.

Tip: Since hyacinth and lilies are so fragrant, keep this in mind if you're entertaining in a tight space.

Sunny yellows

The color yellow is nearly guaranteed to make you smile — it evokes feelings of joy and lightheartedness. According to Teleflora, yellow is also a color of friendship and a bouquet bursting with yellow blooms sends a message of new beginnings and happiness. You'll find bright yellow tulips and gladiolas as well as big, smiling gerbera daisies and daffodils.

Tip: Don't combine daffodils (or any other member of the narcissus family) with other flower types. Narcissi exude a slimy substance that shortens the lifespan of other flowers by clogging their water uptake channels.

Romantic pastels

These are a popular color combination for Mother's Day, Glass said. Pastels such as pink convey grace, gentility and happiness. Add an element of innocence and humility by mixing in white blooms. Look for romantic pastel shades of roses, tulips, hyacinths and ruffled gladiolas.

Tip: Extend the life of your tulips — buy them when the flower heads just start to open (the bud should be closed, but with the color of the flower evident). Keep them away from heat sources. To keep tulips standing up nice and straight in the vase, pre-stretch them by wrapping in newspaper and setting in water for the first 24 hours.

Rosy reds

The color red has an indisputable energy, bringing an essence of strength and passionate love. Lighten up the deep red and that passion gets a little more mom-friendly and fun. Mix shades of red, fuchsia, orange and other rosy hues for an updated, modern color scheme based on red.

Tip: You may be tempted to add fruit to your flower arrangement for an eye-catching arrangement but as the fruit ripens, it emits ethylene gas which can shorten the vase life of some flowers.

by Heather Warlick
Life & Style Editor
Since graduating from University of Central Oklahoma with a Bachelor's Degree in Journalism, Staff Writer Heather Warlick has written stories for The Oklahoman's Life section. Her beats have included science, health, home and garden, family,...
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