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US urges global push for Israeli, Hamas cease-fire

Published on NewsOK Modified: July 21, 2014 at 4:40 pm •  Published: July 21, 2014
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CAIRO (AP) — With high hopes but low expectations, the U.S. stepped up calls Monday for an international push to end fighting in the Gaza Strip as President Barack Obama sent his top envoy to the Mideast to help broker a new cease-fire between Israel and Hamas militants — the third since 2009.

Voicing fresh concern about civilian casualties, Obama reaffirmed his belief that Israel has the right to defend itself against a barrage of more than 1,500 rockets being launched by Hamas.

Yet he said Israel's military assault of Gaza had already done "significant damage" to Hamas' network of tunnels, safe havens and other infrastructure, and said he doesn't want to see more civilians getting killed.

"We have serious concerns about the rising number of Palestinian civilian deaths and the loss of Israeli lives," Obama said in Washington. "And that is why it now has to be our focus and the focus of the international community to bring about a cease-fire that ends the fighting and can stop the deaths of innocent civilians, both in Gaza and in Israel."

As Obama spoke, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry flew to Cairo to join diplomatic efforts to resume a truce that last had been agreed to in November 2012. He will urge the militant Palestinian group to accept a cease-fire agreement offered by Egypt that would halt two weeks of fighting that has descended into war and killed at least 500 Palestinians and more than two-dozen Israelis.

Kerry headed almost immediately into a meeting with U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, where he announced the U.S. will send $47 million in humanitarian aid for tens of thousands of Palestinians who have fled their homes in Gaza to escape the violence. Kerry's top aides warned, however, that achieving an immediate and lasting cease-fire would be difficult and he hoped to make any progress over the next several days to secure even a temporary pause in the bloodshed.

Ban, speaking to reporters before the meeting with Kerry, said he was disappointed that nine months of U.S.-led talks between Israel and the Palestinians hadn't yielded better results. Those negotiations broke off last April after it was clear that neither side would make major concessions needed to clinch a peace plan.

"Violence must stop and must stop now," Ban told reporters. He added, "We can't claim victory simply by returning matters to where they stood before, which led to terrible bloodshed."

It's not clear exactly what Israel and Hamas would each demand in return for agreeing to a truce now, but senior State Department officials said the issue of opening border crossings — potentially into Israel and Egypt — was under discussion.

"Our goal is a cease-fire, and given enough time, that ought to be achievable," said one senior State Department official who briefed reporters traveling with Kerry. "But if it wasn't, then obviously anything that de-escalates the situation on the ground is a movement in a positive direction. So that would certainly be a fallback if we were unable to get the cease-fire that we're aiming for." State Department officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to discuss the issue publicly by name.

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