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Amanda Knox's murder conviction reinstated

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 31, 2014 at 2:39 am •  Published: January 31, 2014
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FLORENCE, Italy (AP) — More than two years after Amanda Knox returned to the U.S. apparently home free, an Italian court Thursday reinstated her murder conviction in the stabbing of her roommate and increased her sentence to 28½ years in prison, raising the specter of a long extradition fight.

Knox, 26, received word in her hometown of Seattle. The former American exchange student said she was "frightened and saddened by the unjust verdict" and blamed "overzealous and intransigent prosecution," ''narrow-minded investigation" and coercive interrogation techniques.

"This has gotten out of hand," Knox said in a statement. "Having been found innocent before, I expected better from the Italian justice system."

Lawyers for Knox and her 29-year-old ex-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, who was also found guilty, vowed to appeal to Italy's highest court, a process that will take at least a year and drag out a seesaw legal battle that has fascinated court-watchers on both sides of the Atlantic and led to lurid tabloid headlines about "Foxy Knoxy" and her sex life.

It was the third trial for Knox and Sollecito, whose first two trials in the 2007 slaying of British exchange student Meredith Kercher produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty, then innocent.

After the acquittal in 2011, Knox returned to the U.S., where she evidently hoped to put herself beyond the reach of Italian law. But Italy's supreme court soon ordered a third trial.

On Thursday, the panel of two judges and six lay jury members deliberated 11½ hours before issuing its decision, stiffening Knox's original 26-year sentence, apparently to take into account an additional conviction for slander, while confirming Sollecito's 25-year term.

Legal experts said it is unlikely Italy will request Knox's extradition before the verdict is final. In Italy, verdicts are not considered final until they are confirmed, usually by the supreme Court of Cassation.

The final decision of whether to hand Knox over to the Italians would rest with the U.S. State Department, and the issue is likely to stir debate over whether she is a victim of double jeopardy, because she was retried after an acquittal

"Many Americans are quite astonished by the ups and downs in this case," said Mary Fan, a former federal prosecutor who teaches at the University of Washington Law School in Seattle.

Some observers have dismissed the double-jeopardy issue because Knox's acquittal was not finalized by Italy's highest court.

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