Ky. gas line blast injures 2, destroys 2 homes

Published on NewsOK Modified: February 13, 2014 at 3:16 pm •  Published: February 13, 2014
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"I think this is just a wake-up call for Kentucky that our legislators need to do something about this," said Cindy Foster, who lives near the pipeline's projected path in northern Scott County. Opponents have asked the Kentucky General Assembly to clarify eminent domain laws so the pipeline developers cannot condemn land without consent from landowners. Several bills addressing the issue have not moved out of House and Senate committees.

Officials at Williams Co., one of the companies behind the Bluegrass Pipeline, have said that their pipeline would be safe for nearby residents.

The Adair County explosion Thursday caused a drop in pressure in the pipeline, known as Line 200, that was detected at 2:05 a.m. by operators at Columbia Gulf Transmission, according to a media release.

A different section of Line 200 that passes through Estill County ruptured in January 2012, sending flames into the air and evacuating about 30 families. No one was injured.

Columbia Gulf Transmission is part of the Houston-based Columbia Pipeline Group, which has about 1,400 miles of pipelines operating in Kentucky. A company spokeswoman on Thursday said the two fires along the same pipeline system "does not mean that the pipeline facilities or circumstances are comparable."

Spokeswoman Katie Dupuis Martin said officials are working to confirm the age of the pipeline that ruptured on Thursday.