Latin Americans reluctantly rally behind Argentina

Published on NewsOK Modified: July 11, 2014 at 7:41 am •  Published: July 11, 2014
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BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — With a reputation for arrogance and illusions of European-styled grandeur, Argentines have long been the objects of scorn and the butt of jokes across Latin America

But for at least 90 minutes on Sunday, when Argentina takes on Germany in the World Cup final, most Latin Americans will put aside their irritation with their proud neighbors as they look to Lionel Messi and his teammates to salvage what's left of the region's soccer pride.

A defeat for Argentina would be historic: Never has a European team been crowned champion on this side of the Atlantic.

But in the wake of Germany's 7-1 thrashing of host Brazil even the most-devoted believers in the spontaneous and stylish Latin American brand of soccer are wondering if the region is outmatched.

"My heart wants Argentina to win, but my brain says Germany will," confessed Alberto Ramos Salcedo, a Colombian journalist and author who frequently writes about soccer.

That Argentina has stepped into the role as the region's flag bearer is a cruel reversal for many.

An online poll in 19 countries taken by YouGov together with The New York Times prior to the World Cup found that in most Latin American countries surveyed people said the team they rooted against was Argentina, which has won the title twice.

In the early days of the tournament, as Argentina was slow to come to life and underdogs like Costa Rica, Colombia and Mexico rained goals on their opponents, a group of Mexican fans in giant sombreros could be seen on Rio de Janeiro's iconic Copacabana Beach playfully provoking anyone dressed in Argentina's blue and white who crossed their path. Their taunt: "Fiesta Latina, sin Argentina, Fiesta Latina without Argentina."

The animosity toward Argentina stems from the country's settlement by waves of European immigrants beginning in the late 19th century, a demographic marker that long fueled perceptions of economic and cultural superiority over their more indigenous or African-descended neighbors. Even the Italian-influenced Spanish spoken on the streets of Buenos Aires is out of step with the language elsewhere.

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