Lawsuits allege Narconon Arrowhead counselors traded sex for drugs

Published on NewsOK Modified: March 29, 2013 at 10:52 pm •  Published: March 29, 2013
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The suit also alleges the Cantu’s son left the program and spent the night in a nearby park after he witnessed his roommate having a seizure.

Lisa Gray also filed suit, alleging she was told her son would receive treatment that he never received, and that he was charged $15,000 for the program and another $15,000 for “book work.” The suit also alleges the Narconon program is overseen by recovering drug addicts and alcoholics and is a “scheme or a sham and a front to recruit Scientologists.” The suit further alleges that no medical doctor is substantially involved in the program.

Two days after her son was admitted, Narconon officials contacted Gray’s husband and received $10,000 after allegedly telling him payment was needed to be made to save his son’s life, her lawsuit alleges. Another $7,000 payment was made by the son’s grandmother “after she took out loan because she was told (the program) would save (her grandsons) life,” the lawsuit states.

After admission to the program, the suit alleges that her son was not given his inhaler and had trouble breathing and that no doctor had seen him.

Vicky White’s suit alleges that before admitting her son, Narconon staff told her on numerous occasions she “had to do something now” or else her son could die. And although she couldn’t afford the program, she was allegedly told that “to save her son’s life,” financial arrangements could be made.

A separate filing by Gina Nelsen states she paid $25,000 in cash to admit her son after being convinced, based upon “misrepresentations, lies, deceit and fraudulent inducements” that she needed to place her son at the facility. Her suit also alleges the program is a scam, a recruiting tool and funding source for the Church of Scientology which uses “unscientifically based methods of treatment of students by former students” who are unqualified former and current drug addicts and alcoholics.

Nelson’s suit also alleges sex is exchanged for drugs on the property, and the treatment plan entails the reading of books written by L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the Church of Scientology.

Nelson filing also alleges Narconon failed to advise prospective clients that the Narconon program is “not accepted in the medical community as being valid or effective and that the program has more than a 70 percent success rate,” which according to the lawsuit is “unheard of.”

Each of the suits seeks more than $75,000.

In a statement issued Thursday, Narconon Arrowhead said “it is pretty clear that these lawsuits are financially motivated and have no foundation of truth contained in them.

“As in any lawsuit that is filed allegations are made which contain gossip and information that often times is not factual. It is in the courtroom where the truth will prevail.”

According to the statement, the Narconon organization has been helping people “overcome drug and alcohol addiction in the United States for 47 years and in Oklahoma for 23 years.”

“We are confident that justice will be served in these matters and Narconon will continue to achieve its purpose.”

Contact Jeanne LeFlore at jleflore@mcalesternews.com.

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©2013 the McAlester News-Capital (McAlester, Okla.)

Visit the McAlester News-Capital (McAlester, Okla.) at mcalesternews.com

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Topics: t000002488,t000002458,t000190288,t000200081,t000002827,t000386848,t000200086,t000164057



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