Lexington and Purcell, OK, deal with bridge closure

Friday, the Oklahoma Transportation Department ordered the 76-year-old bridge closed until further notice after finding 22 cracks in the beams of the truss system spanning the Canadian River.
by Adam Kemp Modified: February 4, 2014 at 8:00 pm •  Published: February 3, 2014

Mike Phillips fears a closed bridge will equal closed doors.

What normally would be at most a 30-minute round trip has turned into a two-hour ordeal for anyone wanting to travel on U.S. 77/State Highway 39 over the James C. Nance Bridge that links Purcell and Lexington. That includes Phillips, 50, who worries his Purcell furniture store may not survive the closure.

Friday, the Oklahoma Transportation Department ordered the 76-year-old bridge closed until further notice after finding 22 cracks in the beams of the truss system spanning the Canadian River. Residents on both ends of the closed bridge fear businesses will be hurt, cutoff employees could lose jobs and getting critical services and help in emergency situations could be more difficult.

“That bridge was a vital pipeline, and now it's gone,” Phillips said Monday as he sat on a couch in his store showroom empty of customers. “What are we going to do now?”

Expediting repairs

Friday, state Transportation Department officials said they are expediting emergency repairs. For now, crews are working to keep the cracks from getting any bigger, and a contract to repair the fissures could be awarded in March, officials said.

The cracks in the beams are a recent development but are severe enough that experts fear the bridge could collapse under its own weight much like the Minnesota I-35W Bridge that collapsed in 2007. The two bridges have a similar design.

Plans to replace the Nance bridge are in the early stages, but construction isn't likely to take place for years because of the estimated $40 million price tag, said Mike Patterson, Transportation Department director.

More than 10,000 vehicles cross the bridge each day, according to transportation officials.

“We will do repairs as quickly as possible,” Patterson said.

“We do know the impacts to the community.”

Business concerns

Phillips, who has owned Tyler Furniture on the corner of Main Street and Canadian in Purcell for 33 years, said he wonders if he'll have to rethink his business strategy of offering free shipping.


by Adam Kemp
Enterprise Reporter
Adam Kemp is an enterprise reporter and videographer for the Oklahoman and Newsok.com. Kemp grew up in Oklahoma City before attending Oklahoma State University. Kemp has interned for the Oklahoman, the Oklahoma Gazette and covered Oklahoma State...
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