Updates from the Boston marathon explosions

Two explosions shattered the euphoria of the Boston Marathon finish line on Monday, sending authorities out on the course to carry off the injured while the stragglers in the 26.2-mile trek from Hopkinton were rerouted away from the smoking site of the blasts.

FROM STAFF REPORTS Modified: April 15, 2013 at 3:27 pm •  Published: April 15, 2013
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Two explosions shattered the euphoria of the Boston Marathon finish line on Monday, sending authorities out on the course to carry off the injured while the stragglers in the 26.2-mile trek from Hopkinton were rerouted away from the smoking site of the blasts.

Read updates below from national media outlets, NewsOK staff and sports writer Stephanie Kuzydym.

NewsOK 4:08 p.m. Susan Planer Phillips sat in a wheelchair and bent over to loosen up the laces on her grey and blue Asics running shoes.

She just finished the 26.2 miles of the Boston Marathon and wanted to go through getting her finisher medal and personal bag with her phone and clothes. Moments after she stood up, she felt the ground shake.

A nearby female runner grabbed hold of her.

"I immediately thought, 'Oh my god," Phillips told The Oklahoman from a Starbucks about three blocks from the explosion.

Then everyone around her started to cry. They were just a few blocks away from the explosions that have since left two dead and 28 injured in the 2013 Boston Marathon.

"There was a sense of panic in the beginning but now it seems like everyone is trying to be calm," Phillips said. "It was scary."

Phillips said all subway and bus lines closed in Boston, leaving her stranded and stuck from her parents, who were both okay but were a few miles away. They had watched her run by at mile 23.

Sadly, this isn't the first explosion Phillips said she has felt. While living in Edmond in 1995, she felt the explosions from the Oklahoma City Bombing.

Phillips now lives in Oklahoma City, about five miles from the Oklahoma City Memorial.

The last time she ran past it was last Sunday.
NewsOK 4:43 p.m. Phil Tucker has yet to hear his wife Noel's voice, but he has received multiple text messages that indicate she is safe.

The two are partners together in Tucker Law Firm in Edmond.

One text came from a Hawaii phone number. Another came from a 610 area code.

But the first one, that came 30-45 minutes after the bombs exploded, is the one that gave him the most relief: 'At last half mile. 2 bombs went off at finish. Here for 45 minutes. Held on course. Don’t know if Pam okay. No call. Outburst of call and text.’

Noel’s sister Pam was there for a support person, and is safe.

The next one came as someone else texting Phil that they were with Noel.

‘I’m with Noel. She’s okay. We’re being evacuated. How’s Pam?’

Phil responded but found out that the person with the cell phone and his wife were no longer together so he responded, ‘Thanks for your kindness.’

Today has been a flashback, like for many Oklahomans, to April 19, 1995 when the Oklahoma City Bombing at the Murrah Federal Bombing.

Phil and his wife were at the State Courthouse, located directly down the street from that explosion 18 years ago this week.

“I remember some of those feelings,” Phil Tucker told The Oklahoman. "As soon as I heard, I flashed back memory wise to those days. It’s a deal where you just don’t know until you know. We’re just glad she was kind of slower for that finish hill.

“A block can be all the difference in the world.”

-- Stephanie Kuzydym
NewsOK 4:49 p.m. Officials say no immediate changes are planned for the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon in the wake of the explosions at the Boston Marathon.

Kari Watkins, a spokesman for the Oklahoma City National Memorial, said more time is needed to evaluate what happened in Boston and consider whether any changes should be made in the Oklahoma City event, which is planned for Sunday, April 28.