Local leaders work to better serve uninsured in Oklahoma County

Health and local leaders announced Tuesday the creation of the Oklahoma County Community Health Network, a system that will connect Oklahoma County's free clinics with hospitals and help ensure more coordinated care among clinic patients.
by Jaclyn Cosgrove Published: January 24, 2013

Uninsured Oklahoma County residents face many obstacles in receiving health care, an issue city and health leaders are addressing through a health network announced Tuesday.

Health and local leaders announced Tuesday the creation of the Oklahoma County Community Health Network, a system that will serve Oklahoma County's uninsured by connecting them with a higher level of care that's often out of reach for the population.

“There has been conversation in this state about doing things the Oklahoma way and doing things the private sector way, and I will tell you if you really believe that, you have to be encouraged and excited by this opportunity,” said Stanley Hupfeld, co-chairman of the Commission to Transform the Health Care Safety Net in Oklahoma County. “This is very much the opportunity to take care of the poor and underserved by the private sector, by volunteers and by utilizing the best energies of all involved.”

Over the past year, members of the commission worked to create a master plan of how the network will work, outlining costs, goals and issues within the current system.

Oklahoma County is believed to have more community-based and faith-based health care safety net providers per square mile than any other major metropolitan county or region in the United States, according to the commission.

About 732,000 people live in Oklahoma County. About 139,000 of the county's residents are uninsured, and of that population, about 90,500 are uninsured and have household incomes at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level, according to the commission.

The most glaring deficiency in the Oklahoma County safety net is the inability of health centers and charitable clinics to access a broad range of specialty care services for the uninsured in a timely and efficient manner, according to the commission.

To address this issue, network staff members will coordinate these services for patients from charitable clinics and community health centers and do so in a prompt and timely manner, said Pam Cross, executive director of the Health Alliance for the Uninsured.

“Timeliness has a huge impact,” Cross said. “If someone is going repeatedly to the emergency room because they have gallbladder attacks, it makes so much more sense to arrange for that surgery and have that diseased gallbladder removed so they can return to work, and they can be productive family members.”


by Jaclyn Cosgrove
Medical and Health Reporter
Jaclyn Cosgrove writes about health, public policy and medicine in Oklahoma, among other topics. She is an Oklahoma State University graduate. Jaclyn grew up in the southeast region of the state and enjoys writing about rural Oklahoma. She is...
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This is very much the opportunity to take care of the poor and underserved by the private sector, by volunteers and by utilizing the best energies of all involved.”

Stanley Hupfeld,
Co-chairman of the Commission to Transform the Health Care Safety Net in Oklahoma County

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