Lolo Jones back at Olympics, savoring the moment

Published on NewsOK Modified: February 3, 2014 at 9:07 am •  Published: February 3, 2014
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SOCHI, Russia (AP) — Lolo Jones is telling the story about how she became a bobsledder, her words becoming difficult to decipher as she tries to keep herself from crying.

So she wraps the tale up quickly, her eyes welling with tears. She shouts the four words: "They had my back."

Of all the words Jones said Monday, they might have been the most telling. It's no secret that she wasn't going to win popularity contests with her U.S. track and field teammates, especially after enjoying some spoils of fame despite failing to win a hurdles medal in either the Beijing Games of 2008 or the London Olympics four years later.

As a hurdler, she was always alone, often feeling unwanted. As a bobsledder, she's never alone — her teammates go just about anywhere she does. And despite some faux complaining from her about that, it's clear Jones is enjoying her trip to the Sochi Games more than anyone would have guessed when she showed up in Lake Placid, N.Y., for a tryout in the fall of 2012.

"From the first week they accepted me, they embraced me, they lifted me up, and I think it was what I needed to not only be a bobsled athlete but return back to track with my head held high and proud of the things I have achieved in that sport," Jones said. "So I really am grateful for them. I'm almost about to cry because they really gave me a fresh start, for sure."

Jones is one of three brakemen on the women's team, and U.S. officials plan to announce this week the driver-pusher pairings for the competition. Drama tends to find Jones at any Olympics, and this one is no exception, with some members of the national team questioning why she was selected over such experienced pushers as Emily Azevedo and Katie Eberling — both of whom openly aired their frustrations about not making the squad.

Once Jones was picked to the team, conspiracy theories started coming out. NBC played a role, some said. Others felt the U.S. Olympic Committee hoped to capitalize on Jones' popularity. (For the record, American officials not just deny, but laugh at those notions.) Azevedo was quoted as saying Jones' Twitter followers — 377,293 of them as of Monday morning — helped make her a more attractive candidate to the selection committee.

Jones expected some naysayers to question her being selected. She didn't expect how big the storm would be after the pick was revealed.

"This is a sequel," Jones said, drawing a parallel between this and how some track teammates complained that her popularity soared without winning a medal in Beijing or London. "I just wasn't prepared for it. ... I definitely didn't feel it coming this time, but it's hard when you don't make a team. I think sometimes people forget that."

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