Share “Long-range forecasts predict dry, hot...”

Long-range forecasts predict dry, hot summer for Oklahoma

Oklahoma looks to be in for its third consecutive hot, dry summer, Harold Brooks, a research meteorologist at the National Severe Storms Laboratory said.
by William Crum Published: March 12, 2013

Deke Arndt of the National Climatic Data Center, addressing the group over a video link from Washington, D.C., said drought is a natural part of the climate cycle. But the cycle, he said, “is more vigorous” in a period of changing climate.

Wet places are wetter, dry places get drier and big rains get bigger, Arndt said.

Calling drought an issue of supply and demand, he said water in times of drought becomes more costly to extract, use and find.

Arndt compared the effects of tornadoes to the effects of drought — the former leaves a trail of items such as destroyed cars, broken glass, shredded shingles and other debris.

“The debris trail of drought looks like lawsuits, foreclosures and bankruptcies,” he said.

In four of the last five years, drought was the leading cause of crop losses, said Dan Ramsey, president and CEO of the Independent Insurance Agents of Oklahoma.

Ramsey, a former state representative from Canadian and Grady counties, said he learned the importance of conservation as a young Navy sailor: aboard ship “every drop of water mattered.”

by William Crum
Reporter
OU and Norman High School graduate, formerly worked as a reporter and editor for the Associated Press, the Star Tribune in Minneapolis, and the Norman Transcript. Married, two children, lives in Norman.
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Obama to deliver State of the Union on Jan. 20
  2. 2
    Parents of accused Aurora shooter plead for his life
  3. 3
    Dropped your phone in water? The fix isn't rice
  4. 4
    Candy Crowley's final guest is a big one: Obama
  5. 5
    FBI confirms North Korea behind Sony hack
+ show more