Lyric Theatre opens 50th anniversary season with Oklahoma premiere of 'Tarzan'

Lyric is only the third U.S. regional theater Disney has allowed to present the musical “Tarzan.”
BY RICK ROGERS rrogers@opubco.com Published: June 23, 2013

It's a classic story with universal themes: parental loss, the bond forged between mother and son, a young man's search for paternal approval, a struggle to find one's identity, the blossoming of romance and man's relationship to nature.

While such a description may evoke tales of some heavy drama, the narrative in question is actually the musical “Tarzan.” Based on the story by Edgar Rice Burroughs and Disney's 1999 animated film, this musical, which has a score by Phil Collins, opens Lyric Theatre's 50th anniversary season.

Directed by Michael Baron with choreography by Ashley Wells, this production marks the Oklahoma premiere of the Disney musical. Heading the cast are Nicholas Rodriguez as Tarzan, Felicia Boswell as Kala, Steve Blanchard as Kerchak, Heather Botts as Jane and Jamard Richardson as Terk.

The character of Tarzan has long been ingrained in the public's consciousness, through film (played most notably by Johnny Weissmuller), television (Ron Ely) and Disney's animated film (voiced by Tony Goldwyn).

“Anytime you're dealing with a character like Tarzan that has some historical context, I think it's important to honor the past and the great guys who have played the character before,” Rodriguez said. “You use what's available to you and add your own take to the character.”

As in Burroughs' novel, Tarzan is raised by Kala, a gorilla who adopts the young boy after his parents are killed. And while Kala's mate Kerchak is quick to lose his temper, she maintains a sense of calm that lends her an almost magisterial presence.

“When I first read the script, I recognized that she had a really gentle strength,” Boswell said. “It kind of reminded me of my mom and I am my mother's child. I don't have to scream or stomp my feet to be understood.”

Given that the story of “Tarzan” unfolds in the jungle, the title character and his simian friends are naturally expected to take flight. Daniel Stover, director of AntiGravity Orlando, is supervising the flying sequences in Lyric's production of “Tarzan.”

“When the Broadway production was getting ready to open, AntiGravity did a three-week workshop in Las Vegas on all the different ways for monkeys and Tarzan to fly,” Stover said. “For this production, we're using a combination of manual and motorized flying.

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