Manhunt halts most of Boston's mass transit

Mass transportation to and from the Boston area was virtually shut down Friday while police engaged in massive manhunt before capturing a suspect in Monday's Boston Marathon bombing. The message from transit authorities was clear: “Go/stay home.”
By SCOTT MAYEROWITZ Modified: April 19, 2013 at 9:49 pm •  Published: April 20, 2013

— Mass transportation to and from the Boston area was virtually shut down Friday while police engaged in massive manhunt before capturing a suspect in Monday's Boston Marathon bombing. The message from transit authorities — shared in the morning via Twitter — was clear: “Go/stay home.”

As the manhunt stretched into the afternoon, Amtrak stopped all trains on the heavily traveled corridor between New York and Boston. Its service from Boston to Maine also was halted. All major intercity bus lines suspended service to the area. Authorities also stopped service on commuter trains into Boston as well as the city's subway and buses.

After an intensive search yielded no suspect, authorities lifted the stay-indoors warning Friday evening and the transit system resume running. The suspect later was found hiding in a boat in the backyard of a home in suburban Watertown, Mass.

Only air travel functioned normally throughout Friday. Planes took off and landed mostly on schedule at Logan International, although passengers entering the airport drew extra scrutiny from state police.

All major highways in the region remained open except in Watertown, Mass., the center of the manhunt. But they — and most city streets — remained eerily empty as people heeded the advice to stay home.

“I'm just like everybody else in greater Boston, just staying at home, glued to the television,” said Bob Trane, an alderman in Somerville, Mass., a densely populated city minutes from downtown Boston. “There is nobody out in the streets, very few cars, very few people walking.”

Elsewhere, travelers scrambled to find a way home.

Stranded by the Amtrak shutdown, the Rev. Victoria Weinstein passed the time with a beer in a New York bar. She weighed her options for getting home to a Boston suburb: rides with friends, family or waiting a day. She even considering hitching a ride with a stranger at the bar.