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Mary's Miscellanea: A horse tale, llama love and a view of the town

Mary Phillips Modified: August 12, 2013 at 2:05 pm •  Published: August 12, 2013
• I grew up living in the city and wishing for a horse.
I never got my own horse, but I got to know three horses very well.
Misty, my cousin Lois’ horse, lived in Sulphur, and we visited often when I was little.
Growing up, my friend Janice boarded her horse, Trianna, first at the Tinker Air Force Base stables and then around town.
We would ride stable horses and Trianna across the base.
Finally, my friend Terry had Rusty and Rusty’s baby, Chabot, the only pink horse I have ever seen.
All of my horse friends lived long lives and passed on.
I miss having horses in my life, but recently reading the book, “Horses Never Lie About Love,” by Jana Harris, brought back the joy of knowing horses.
The book recounts Jana Harris and her husband Mark’s journey as they moved to Washington state as college teachers (their day jobs) and the opportunity to own a small farm to raise horses for dressage.
In the book, when they meet True Colors, she is in great shape, running wild with a foal at her side, but several months later when the horse arrives at their farm, she is in bad shape, both physically and emotionally.
Nursed back to health, True Colors recovers physically, but she remains emotionally traumatized.
Harris learns that if she is to keep True Colors, she has to take her on her terms, a shy and sometimes very stubborn horse.
As the years go by, True Colors becomes the anchor, not only for the horses on the farm but also for the humans.
For horse lovers, this is a book worth reading about the highs and lows of owning and being owned by a horse.
As of January 2012, a search of the Internet showed True Colors was still living at the ripe old age of 26.
• Last week, I told the tale of the lonely Mama Llama and zookeeper Leo Blondin’s animal trade that depended on finding transportation.
The Mistletoe Express came forward and helped with the animal trade with the Colorado Springs zoo, and Blondin returned with a mate for the city’s llama and a dozen porcupines.
Below is the newspaper photo of the happy couple.
Mamma Llama and her beau. - FROM THE OKLAHOMAN
Mamma Llama and her beau. - FROM THE OKLAHOMAN
• Another story that appeared in The Oklahoman 75 years ago was an event that had crowds looking up.
Fred M. Carter was a 23-year-old painter who made his living painting flag poles and smoke stacks.
On Tuesday, Aug. 16, 1938, Carter was at the top of the 70-foot pole on top of the 32-story Ramsey tower, now known as City Place Tower.
Boy, he would have had a view from the top of the pole that swayed about 3 feet in each direction as he painted.
Exterior of City Place, 204 N. Robinson, as Oklahoma City firemen investigate a gas leak where fumes entered the building after a backhoe struck an 8 inch gas line doing construction work across the street from City Place Friday, July 27, 2012.  Photo by Paul B. Southerland, The Oklahoman
Exterior of City Place, 204 N. Robinson, as Oklahoma City firemen investigate a gas leak where fumes entered the building after a backhoe struck an 8 inch gas line doing construction work across the street from City Place Friday, July 27, 2012. Photo by Paul B. Southerland, The Oklahoman
Find these and more interesting stories in The Oklahoman’s Archives. 
If you come across the interesting or the odd or if you just have a question on Oklahoma history I might be able to answer, e-mail me at mphillips@opubco.com