Mass. firm in meningitis case eyes bankruptcy help

Published on NewsOK Modified: December 21, 2012 at 8:47 pm •  Published: December 21, 2012
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"We're looking for additional people who are responsible here for the compromise that occurred," she said.

New England Compounding Center was founded in 2006 by brothers-in-law Barry Cadden, the company's chief pharmacist, and Gregory Conigliaro. Compounding pharmacies custom-mix medications in doses or in forms that generally aren't commercially available.

Meningitis is an inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord. The fungal meningitis outbreak was discovered in Tennessee in September, though Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials say the earliest deaths tied to the outbreak date back to July.

Health officials say as many as 14,000 people received the steroid shots, mostly for back pain. In early October, the company issued a nationwide recall of the steroid and ceased operations. Later that month, Massachusetts moved to permanently revoke the company's pharmacy license after inspectors found unsterile conditions at its Framingham facilities.

State officials charge the company with violating its state license, which permitted the company to make drugs only for individual patients based on specific prescriptions. Instead, state officials say, the company made large batches of drugs for broad distribution.

NECC had said it always strove to follow the laws in the states it operated in.

According to Friday's filing, the bankruptcy court has granted the company extra time to file its schedules of assets and liabilities and statement of financial affairs.

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Associated Press reporter Sylvia Lee Wingfield contributed to this report from Boston.