Meatloaf Madness gets some Oklahoma flavor

The Food Dude shares a meatloaf recipe from The Made in Oklahoma Coalition.
by Dave Cathey Published: April 24, 2013
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The recipe also gives you the option of mixing in milk or Choc beer. I was fully prepared to go with the Choc, but the bottle turned out to be empty when I reached to pour it in the mix. The milk was just fine, and the rest of the Choc paired perfectly with the meatloaf.

Overall, this is a rock-solid recipe that was super easy to make and was a hit with dad and son.

That pretty much covers all aspects of the meatloaf credo.

So enjoy it, and keep those meatloaf recipes coming.

Next month, in honor of a widely popular Hispanic holiday, Cinco de Mayo, I will feature a couple of Mexican Meatloaf recipes, so if you've got one of those get it to me quickly. The address by snail-mail is P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125 or simply email it to dcathey@opubco.com.


by Dave Cathey
Food Editor
The Oklahoman's food editor, Dave Cathey, keeps his eye on culinary arts and serves up news and reviews from Oklahoma’s booming food scene.
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Oklahoma Barbecue Meatloaf

1½ pounds ground beef (I use 80-20 ground chuck)

½ pound J.C. Potter regular sausage (I chose the “Hot” regular)

20 saltine crackers, crumbled

1 large egg, beaten

¼ cup Choc beer or Hiland milk

½ teaspoon Head Country All-Purpose Championship Seasoning

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

¼ cup chopped onion

½ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

8 slices Bar-S Bacon

¼ cup Head Country Bar-B-Q Sauce

• Combine ground beef, sausage, crackers, egg, Choc beer or Hiland milk, Head Country seasoning, parsley, onion, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Shape into two loaves, and place side by side in a 9-by-13-inch baking dish.

• Lay Bar-S Bacon over meatloaves, wrapping the ends underneath each loaf. Spread Head Country Bar-B-Q Sauce over top.

• Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Allow to cool slightly before serving.

SOURCE: The Made in Oklahoma Coalition

Cook's notes: My chef friends taught me a long time ago that if you're going to wrap bacon around something, you should first blanch it. Simply bring plenty of water to a boil in a large pot. Drop the bacon in for about a minute and pull it out. By blanching off some of the fat, the bacon tends not to smoke up the whole house and maintains a nice, flat surface that makes it much easier to slice. I also decided to withhold the sauce until the last 10 minutes of cooking to protect the sauce from becoming a black spot that bore only the faint memory of Head Country's tasty sauce.

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