Medical groups file brief in Hobby Lobby case disputing claims on emergency contraceptives

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and several other medical groups that support the use of emergency contraceptives have challenged Oklahoma City-based Hobby Lobby Store's Inc.'s claim that the drugs are a form of abortion.
by Brianna Bailey Published: March 23, 2013
Advertisement
;

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and several other medical groups that support the use of emergency contraceptives have challenged Hobby Lobby Store's Inc.'s claim that the drugs are a form of abortion.

The groups moved Thursday to file a friend of the court brief in Hobby Lobby's court battle over a portion of the Affordable Care Act that requires the company to cover the cost of emergency contraceptives for its workers through its employee health plan.

Hobby Lobby argues that the drugs are a type of abortion and that covering the cost of the drugs for its employees would violate the Christian religious beliefs of CEO David Green and his family.

The contraceptives Hobby Lobby takes issue with include Ella and Plan B, commonly known as the week-after and morning-after pills, as well as some types of IUDs.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, a nonprofit that claims to represent about 90 percent of all board-certified obstetricians and gynecologists practicing in the United States, filed the brief along with seven other women's health groups and three academics including James Trussell, senior fellow for the reproductive health advocacy group, the Guttmacher Institute.

The groups moved to get involved in Hobby Lobby's lawsuit to dispel myths about emergency contraceptives, the brief said. Several anti-abortion and conservative groups have also filed friend of the court briefs in the case in support of the company's position.

Newest brief

“This court has already been provided with considerable misinformation concerning the supposed ‘life-ending' effects of emergency contraception,” the groups said in a 26-page legal filing. “Likewise, the public discourse on (emergency contraceptives) is infused with misleading rhetoric stemming from political or religious views.”

| |

by Brianna Bailey
Business Writer
Brianna Bailey has lived in Idaho, Germany and Southern California, but Oklahoma is her adopted home. She has a bachelor's degree in Journalism from the Univerisity of Oklahoma and has worked at several newspapers in Oklahoma and Southern...
+ show more

Advertisement


Trending Now



AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Boy saves for Playstation, then gives money away
  2. 2
    Stephen Colbert visits Davis Letterman
  3. 3
    Macklemore hits sour note with his Jordan shoe
  4. 4
    Cuba Gooding Jr.'s Wife Sara Kapfer Files For Divorce After 20 Years of Marriage
  5. 5
    Teen's victory over McDonald's Happy Meal toys
+ show more