Microwave keeps bread mold at bay

The Associated Press Modified: February 4, 2013 at 2:40 pm •  Published: February 4, 2013
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photo - In this Dec. 6, 2012, photo, Don Stull, chief executive officer of Microzap, Inc., places a loaf of bread inside a patented microwave that kills mold spores in Lubbock, Texas. The company claims the technology allows bread to stay mold-free for 60 days. (AP Photo/John Mone)
In this Dec. 6, 2012, photo, Don Stull, chief executive officer of Microzap, Inc., places a loaf of bread inside a patented microwave that kills mold spores in Lubbock, Texas. The company claims the technology allows bread to stay mold-free for 60 days. (AP Photo/John Mone)

LUBBOCK, Texas — Attention, bread shoppers: A Texas company could have the answer to some consumers' unwelcome discovery that just-purchased loaves contain mold.

MicroZap Inc. claims its technology allows bread to stay mold-free for 60 days. The bread is bombarded with microwaves for about 10 seconds, which kills the mold spores, said chief executive officer Don Stull said.

The process could eliminate bakers' need for preservatives and ingredients used to mask preservatives' flavor, as well as reduce food waste and increase bread's shelf life, he said.

Researchers at Texas Tech University also see using the technology in bread made in developing countries, where there are fewer food safety standards and spoilage is a problem.

"It could help us provide an abundant food source for those in need," said Mindy Brashear, director of the Lubbock university's Center for Food Industry Excellence. The prospect of helping people in developing countries is what motivated the microbiology professor to help develop the technology over the last eight years.

After 60 days, researchers found the treated bread that remained packaged had the same mold content when compared to a freshly baked loaf, Stull said. In the end, though, he knows it comes down to consumers' palates.

"The consumers saw no discernible quality difference in the breads," Stull said of testers who found the treated bread's taste and texture unchanged.

An Associated Press reporter found the same. Though slightly warm from the microwaves, a piece of whole-grain white bread was soft and tasted like one that hadn't been zapped. Sixty-day-old bread was not available to taste.

Estimates from the Natural Resources Defense Council this year indicated that in 2008, in-store food losses in the U.S. totaled an estimated 43 billion pounds — 10 percent of all foods supplied to retail outlets — most of which are perishables, including bread.

Unrefrigerated bread in plastic packaging will succumb to mold in about 10 days, so keeping it at bay for 60 days presents a fresh proposition.

Not so fast, says Ruth MacDonald, professor and chair of food science and human nutrition at Iowa State University. There are thousands of airborne mold spores everywhere, she said, adding that though bread producers might like the technology for storage and transportation, those spores are problematic at home.

"Once you open (the bag of bread), all bets are off," she said.

Mold is a type of fungus that forms because bread wrapped in plastic packaging still has water inside it. When that trapped water begins to evaporate inside the bag, the bread's surface becomes moist, creating the ideal environment for mold.

Researchers with the university tested the MicroZap on three different mold types on breads inside plastic bags with twist ties, and the microwaves destroyed each one.


by Matt Dinger
Court Reporter
Matt Dinger was born and raised in Oklahoma City. He has worked in OPUBCO's News and Information Center since 2006, and has been assigned to the breaking news desk since its formation in fall 2008. He specializes in crime and police reporting.
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