Mid-Del School Board votes to sell two elementaries

The Midwest City-Del City School Board voted unanimously Monday night to sell Sooner Rose Elementary, Traub Elementary and the eastern Oklahoma County district's enrollment building. There was no discussion before the vote, which was taken at a special board meeting.
By Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll@opubco.com Published: March 1, 2011
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Braelyn Polite shook his head and covered his eyes. The 12-year-old cried into his mother's shoulder. His elementary school — the one his older brother attended and his younger brother still goes to — had been put up for sale.

His mom, Nikki, wiped tears from her eyes as she talked about volunteering there with other parents.

“There's nothing wrong with that school,” she said.

The Midwest City-Del City School Board voted unanimously Monday night to sell Sooner Rose Elementary, Traub Elementary and the district's enrollment building. There was no discussion before the vote, which was taken at a special board meeting.

Superintendent Bill Scoggan, who will retire June 30, did not attend the meeting.

Parents, teachers and administrators packed the boardroom and grumbled when the board members did not discuss the sale before the vote. The public was not allowed to comment because it was a special meeting, district spokeswoman Stacey Boyer said.

A few people shouted at board members as they recessed for executive session after the vote.

“Since when did my child's education become surplus?” Rachel Osentowski called out as the board left the room.

The audience applauded her as she left in tears.

Outside, Osentowski said she is distraught about the sale of Sooner Rose Elementary, where her 5-year-old son attends kindergarten. He has a wonderful teacher, she said, and test scores there are better than the state average.

“She's an excellent teacher — the best,” she said. “This is absurd.”

Sooner Rose and Traub elementary schools both were on the list of six schools that would have been closed if a $191 million bond issue passed in December. The bond failed with 59.63 percent of the vote, just short of the 60 percent super majority needed. The board will consider future bond proposals beginning in April.


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