Midwest City veterans memorial gets closer to groundbreaking

Midwest City leaders have released drawings of a memorial to be built in Joe B. Barnes Regional Park.
BY NASREEN IQBAL niqbal@opubco.com Published: November 5, 2012
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It started four years ago, with a vision retired businessman Andy Cornelius had about the American flag as he walked through Joe B. Barnes Regional Park.

“It's kind of the center of the community; a lot of activities go on there,” Cornelius said. “I thought, for a city so invested in the military, we should at least have a flag.”

So he started knocking on doors and asking friends what they thought about the idea.

“He came to me and told me about his idea of putting a flag up at the park,” lawyer and former state Sen. Jim Howell said. “At first we were just going to do the flag but then the thing just ballooned into a memorial.”

Cornelius' dream became a $200,000 project led by a committee of friends, neighbors, and patriotic residents of Midwest City to build the city's first veterans memorial at Joe B. Barnes Regional Park, with all five branches of the military represented.

The American flag, state flag and prisoner of war flags will fly year-round, and visitors can pay tribute to those who have served by reading the names displayed on a monument or simply taking a moment to say thank you.

The memorial will include seating, a paved courtyard and will be handicapped accessible. Organizers plan to host tribute events on holidays that celebrate the armed forces.

“This memorial is not for a hero. It's for all of them — all of our veterans, past, present and future,” project chairman Hiawatha Bouldin said.

Bouldin is one of the friends Cornelius reached out to when suggesting an American flag be placed in the park. A former medical recruiter for Tinker Air Force Base, Bouldin remains involved in the Midwest City community.

“I was just the person to hop on board first,” Bouldin said.

“Considering that this place is what it is, in part, because of its strong military presence, we thought we needed something to show our appreciation. We want to put something out there that our children will appreciate. We want it to be more than a memorial; we want it to be a living monument,” Bouldin said.