Share “Millennials not waiting for their turn to...”

Millennials not waiting for their turn to transform downtown Oklahoma City

Downtown Oklahoma City's leadership may skip a generation.
by Steve Lackmeyer Modified: May 6, 2013 at 8:29 pm •  Published: May 7, 2013
Advertisement
/articleid/3807060/1/pictures/2046105">Photo - Ethan Schlecht was among several artists performing at Saturday's Better Block OKC at Farmers Public Market. Millennials led the way in re-introducing Oklahoma City residents to Farmers Public Market just south of downtown by staging a Better Block OKC festival featuring live music, food trucks, pop-up shops and permanent improvements to area that included directional signage, curbside parking spots and a fresh coat of paint. Photo provided by Eric Dryer <strong></strong>
Ethan Schlecht was among several artists performing at Saturday's Better Block OKC at Farmers Public Market. Millennials led the way in re-introducing Oklahoma City residents to Farmers Public Market just south of downtown by staging a Better Block OKC festival featuring live music, food trucks, pop-up shops and permanent improvements to area that included directional signage, curbside parking spots and a fresh coat of paint. Photo provided by Eric Dryer

It was the millennials who, by and large, made last year's Better Block OKC at NW 7 and Hudson a success story, and the same generation put a lot of sweat equity into making the case on Saturday for a revived Farmers Public Market district just south of downtown.

Consider that college students from the University of Oklahoma repainted the rows of produce stands that for far too long have stood empty. Young 20-something architects, planners and urban activists teamed up to get sponsors and experts to contribute to the cause of creating curbside parking, permanent directional signage and other improvements that will last long beyond Saturday's festivities.

The same generation also can be credited with sparking a vibrant downtown nightlife, filling up hundreds of new apartments, and filling up restaurants like Kitchen No. 324 in the Braniff Building on weekends when such Central Business District eatery hours were believed to be economic suicide missions.

The Generation X folks I talk to marvel at such achievements. We're outnumbered, and we wonder, maybe, that when it's our turn, instead of making the millennials wait, we immediately give them the lead on guiding the ongoing downtown Oklahoma City revival.

by Steve Lackmeyer
Business Reporter
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter, columnist and author who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's...
+ show more


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Crowdfunding For Real Estate: Buyer Beware
  2. 2
    10 affordable countries that budget travelers can't miss
  3. 3
    These wearables double as travel gadgets
  4. 4
    Police return woman’s stolen car — with drugs, weapons added
  5. 5
    Judge Says NSA Program Is Unconstitutional, 'It's Time to Move'
+ show more

FEATURED JOBS



× Trending business Article