Minnesota exit poll: Gender gap decides amendment

Associated Press Modified: November 7, 2012 at 2:02 am •  Published: November 7, 2012
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President Barack Obama and Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar posted victories in Minnesota, while a proposed constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage was defeated Tuesday night. Here's a look at results from an exit poll conducted in Minnesota for The Associated Press:

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WOMEN THWART MARRIAGE AMENDMENT

A distinct gender gap divided voters on the proposed amendment to define marriage as only between a man and a woman, and women's opposition appeared to make the difference. Men were solidly in favor of the amendment, according to exit polling, but women voted against it by a larger margin. Voters under age 50 also were against it by a substantial majority, while those over 50 were strongly in favor. Seven in 10 voters who attend religious services and four out of five born-again or evangelical voters favored the amendment, as did three in four Republicans. Reflecting the partisan split, three in four Democrats voted against. Heavy opposition in the Twin Cities also proved important, with six in 10 voters there voting "No."

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OBAMA HOLDS ON

Obama lost the support of male voters from his 2008 victory in the state but was backed by 60 percent of women, 63 percent of voters under age 30, a majority of those with family incomes of up to $100,000, and three-quarters of those who said that health care reform is the most important issue. Urban backing also worked to his advantage; he carried the Twin Cities easily (62 percent) while losing the collar counties and maintaining a competitive showing elsewhere.

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KLOBUCHAR SWEEPS ALL REGIONS

Klobuchar easily secured a second term by prevailing over Kurt Bills in every region of the state, every age group and among most other demographic groups. Bills lost the backing of nearly a quarter of his fellow Republicans. He was preferred by three-quarters of self-described conservatives, a majority of white evangelical voters and three-fifths of those who voted for the marriage amendment.

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