Minnesota lawmakers boost minimum wage to $9.50

Published on NewsOK Modified: April 10, 2014 at 4:49 pm •  Published: April 10, 2014
Advertisement
;

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Minnesota workers earning the minimum wage will see yearly raises under a bill given final approval Thursday that pushes the hourly rate to $9.50 by 2016 and enables automatic increases in the future.

The bill gives Minnesota one of the nation's most generous pay floors after years of being among the states with the lowest minimum wage. The bill passed with only Democratic votes after Republicans said it would cause hardship on businesses and narrow opportunities for those the legislation is designed to help.

The state House passed the bill a day after the Senate, both of which are controlled by Democrats. Gov. Mark Dayton announced plans to sign the bill Monday afternoon.

"Thousands and thousands of families will have a better life because of what we do today," said Rep. Tim Mahoney, DFL-St. Paul.

Supportive lawmakers shared personal stories of flipping burgers or doing other entry-level jobs for little pay. "Many of the low-wage workers are the hardest working people I know," said Rep. Joe Radinovich, DFL-Crosby.

The floor wage required of most employers will climb from $6.15 per hour to $8 per hour in August. It goes to $9 next year and $9.50 the year after. In future years, the rate could rise by 2.5 percent through an inflationary mechanism. Those future hikes could be suspended if the economy stumbles, but officials could authorize catch-up increases once times improve.

Minnesota last raised its minimum wage in 2005.

Democratic backers hailed the bill as an overdue raise for more than 350,000 people making the least now. They said people in that situation tend to spend what they make quickly, helping cycle money into the local economy.

Republican lawmakers relayed concerns from business groups that the wage is rising too much too fast. They warned it would be a crushing blow on grocery stores and restaurants, causing them to raise prices or pare back employee rolls.

"I'm sure Minnesota will survive after this happens but a lot of people won't get that first line on their resume," said Republican Rep. Bob Gunther, a retired grocer from Fairmont. "It's going to be fair for some people. It's going to be devastating for others."

Continue reading this story on the...