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Monitors find some Oklahoma DHS reform efforts fall short

DHS child welfare reforms have shown improvement in some areas, but are falling woefully short in others, according to report issued by independent monitors retained to oversee compliance with a settlement to a class-action lawsuit.
by Randy Ellis Modified: April 29, 2014 at 10:55 pm •  Published: April 30, 2014
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Oklahoma’s DHS child welfare reform efforts have shown improvement in some areas, but are falling woefully short in others, according to a report issued by independent monitors retained to oversee compliance with a settlement to a class-action lawsuit.

“We’re very disappointed in the efforts that are being made and in what really seem to be profound problems in the agency at this point,” said Marcia Robinson Lowry, executive director of Children’s Rights, the New York-based nonprofit organization that filed the lawsuit on behalf of children in state custody.

Lowry said she is very concerned about the effectiveness of Department of Human Services leadership and if the agency doesn’t start showing more progress, “there may be a need for some further action.”

DHS Director Ed Lake said the agency continues to work on its deficiencies.

“The pace of a few of our initiatives hasn’t been what we all wanted it to be, but that certainly hasn’t been for lack of effort or support for our work,” Lake said. “Our incredibly dedicated caseworkers, supervisors and managers are making extraordinary efforts to improve our system. We believe progress is being made, even with the number of children in our care, and the data supports our belief.”

Getting children out of state shelters and into foster homes was one of the major goals to which DHS officials agreed.

DHS has made “good faith efforts” toward that goal for children under 2 years old, but it has come at the expense of older children, according to the independent monitors’ report.

The agency experienced a “marked increase” in the number of nights children ages 6 to 12 were required to spend in state shelters from July to December 2013, and those numbers are still rising, the report said.

“There is a similar upward trend for children 13 years of age and older,” the report said.

The monitors said they “remain very concerned about the growing number of shelter placements for children ages 6 and older.”

The independent monitors also had harsh criticism for DHS’ foster home recruitment efforts, noting the agency was given a goal of achieving a net gain of 615 foster homes during the fiscal year that will end June 30, but had only added 50 foster homes halfway through the fiscal year.

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by Randy Ellis
Investigative Reporter
For the past 30 years, staff writer Randy Ellis has exposed public corruption and government mismanagement in news articles. Ellis has investigated problems in Oklahoma's higher education institutions and wrote stories that ultimately led to two...
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