Moore builder Jay London uses tornado-resistant technology

Technology has drastically reduced concerns about cost and aesthetics that led builders away from concrete and masonry construction after the 1950s, according to the owner of a shelter manufacturer.
BY TIM FALL trfall@gmail.com Modified: January 9, 2014 at 11:42 am •  Published: January 11, 2014

The tornado was “why we chose Oklahoma to be our next state to partner with local builders,” Greenwald said. “Like the rest of the country we were deeply saddened by the loss of life and property. We want to help rebuild Moore stronger and alleviate the amount of devastation should Oklahomans face another significant tornado.”

Greenwald said that according to structural integrity reports of homes after disasters, a house using his company's technology would be standing after a storm of the intensity of May 20, even if the windows and doors were breached.

Greenwald said technology has drastically reduced concerns about cost and aesthetics that led builders away from concrete and masonry construction after the 1950s.

Indeed, London said his spec home's price will be only 5 to 10 percent higher than if he had opted not to build using the Montenero shell, listing for “about $215,000” compared to “probably $205,000” for traditional framing.

For some people, the increase would be worth it, Greenwald said.

“The bedroom is basically a safe area that allows family members to gather comfortably within their home and not race elsewhere for cover every time the sirens sound,” he said. “If people know they can safely stay in their homes during storm threats, the stress of clamoring for shelter and worrying about loved ones or property loss is no longer an issue.”

London, a licensed real estate agent, said he is aware of buyers' sensitivity to home pricing. He said he thinks the concrete-reinforced living space and long-term peace of mind that come with it will be appealing, even with the slightly hiked sticker price.

Even with a delivery delay caused by December's ice storm, the structure was fitted to its foundation before Christmas. London said his crew would have the home completed and on the market by the end of March.



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