Nearly 260 OKC school district third-graders who failed test could be promoted

In the Oklahoma City school district, 697 third-graders are in danger of being held back in the coming school year unless they meet the exemptions or demonstrate the ability to read at a second-grade level or higher.
by Tim Willert Modified: May 15, 2014 at 10:00 pm •  Published: May 15, 2014
Advertisement
;

photo - Third-grader Tylas Rhodes, 9, reads from the book
Third-grader Tylas Rhodes, 9, reads from the book "Stone Fox" Students at Sequoyah Elementary in northwest Oklahoma City. PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND - THE OKLAHOMAN

Nearly 700 third-graders in the Oklahoma City school district who failed a state reading test have yet to qualify for “good-cause” exemptions and could be held back in the coming year, school leaders announced Thursday.

As many as 259 other students who scored unsatisfactory meet the initial criteria for an exemption and likely will be promoted if the exemption is approved by each student’s teacher and principal, and by interim Superintendent Dave Lopez, district officials said.

That leaves 697 third-graders in danger of being held back in the coming school year unless they meet the exemptions or demonstrate the ability to read at a second-grade level or higher.

“It is not a lost cause,” said Wilbur House, the district’s director of curriculum development. “With rigorous reading activities and strong instruction in phonics and comprehension we know our students can be strong readers.”

To help ensure promotion, the district is offering added reading and language instruction over the summer to assist students who must pass alternative exams or complete portfolios of their work.

About 956 out of 3,445 district third-graders failed the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test. Of the 259 students identified by the district as likely qualifying for exemptions, 76 are English-Language learners who have had less than two years of English and are not proficient; 61 have demonstrated an acceptable level of performance on an alternative assessment; 115 have disabilities and have been retained once; and seven have been retained twice, school officials said.

The number of exemptions is expected to rise in the coming weeks because students can retest twice before the end of the summer and complete teacher-developed portfolios that show they can read on grade level.

“We are still evaluating the individual test data; that information will be used to help us identify areas of improvement,” House said.

Continue reading this story on the...

by Tim Willert
Education Reporter
Tim Willert is a native Californian with Oklahoma ties who covers education. Prior to moving to Oklahoma in June 2011, he was as an editor for FOXSports.com in Century City, Calif., and reported on courts for the Los Angeles Daily Journal and...
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Lankford compares struggles with Islamic radicals to Cold War
  2. 2
    OU football: Sooners rank No. 1 in ESPN power rankings, playoff forecast
  3. 3
    Missing Afghan Soldiers Apprehended Trying To Cross Border Into Canada
  4. 4
    Scotland's leader: Voters 'tricked' in referendum
  5. 5
    Kenan Thompson -- I'm Leaving 'Saturday Night Live' After This Season
+ show more