• The most promising areas of autism research

    Published: Thu, Apr 16, 2015

    Researchers have been making tremendous progress in their efforts to understand the causes of autism , as well as which interventions may be most effective to help children with the disorder thrive, CBS News reports. This work is especially critical as the number of children in the U.S. with autism grows. Approximately 1 in 68 children in the U.S. currently has autism, an increase of nearly 30 percent in recent years -- at least partly due to greater awareness and improved diagnostics. Experts in the field say there are a number of areas of research that could potentially change the lives of millions of families. Here are a few that are showing significant progress -- and promise.

  • KFOR: Multiple fire departments worked large Spencer house fire

    Published: Thu, Apr 16, 2015

    UPDATE 4/16/2015: No one was home at the time of the fire in Spencer, KFOR reports from crews on the scene. The fire has been knocked out, but fire crews will be on scene for a large portion of the morning, and, according to scanner traffic, a fire marshal has been called out to investigate the fire ...

  • OSU Bus Hit By SUV In Waco

    Published: Thu, Apr 16, 2015

    WACO -- The bus carrying the Oklahoma State University Women's Equestrian team was t-boned by the driver of a SUV who ran a red light Wednesday, KWTX reports. The driver of that SUV ran a red light and hit the bus on the driver's side ...

  • Police beating victim: Officer's dismissal is good first step

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    Floyd Dent, in his first interview following the firing of Inkster police officer William Melendez, said the dismissal is a good first step.

  • Report: Thabo Sefolosha provoked by NYPD before arrest

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    An SI.com source tells a conflicting story about former Oklahoma City Thunder guard Thabo Sefolosha than the one in the New York Police Department's police report from his arrest last week. SI.com says a source close to Sefolosha is claiming the real story differs from the police account -- which says an officer "observed the defendant Thabo Sefolosha run in an aggressive manner towards the direction" of another officer. From SI.com's Greg Hanlon : "According to the source, it was the officer who was the initial aggressor. The source said that while officers were dispersing dozens of people near the scene, one officer focused on Sefolosha, 'and then he continues to track him down the block like a D-back tracking a receiver.' "At the time, the source said, Sefolosha and (Hawks teammate Pero) Antic were walking down the block to get into a car that would take them back to their team hotel. The source said Sefolosha did not run toward the cop as the complaint said. Rather, the source said 'Sefolosha turns to him and asked in substance what the officer’s problem was with him.’' At this point, the source said, Sefolosha and the officer got into an argument, which led to Sefolosha’s arrest for obstruction a governmental function, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. The arrest took place at the corner of 10th Avenue, more than 120 feet away from the scene of the stabbing at 1OAK night club." Sefolosha will miss the entire postseason with the Atlanta Hawks after suffering a fractured fibula and ligament damage during his arrest last week for obstructing government administration, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. On Tuesday, Sefolosha said in a statement that his injury " was caused by the police ."

  • AT&T Adds Another Lawsuit to the Net Neutrality Pile-On

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    AT&T has joined cable industry and wireless industry lobbyists in suing the Federal Communications Commission’s over new Net neutrality rules. AT&T claims that in creating its new Net Neutrality rules, the FCC has violated the US Constitution and the federal Communications Act of 1934.

  • Corporate tax havens stiff taxpayers by $110B a year

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    On the eve of Tax Day, a prominent consumer advocacy group on Tuesday provided a vivid reminder of how some of the largest Fortune 500 companies avoid paying billions of dollars in U.S. taxes on profits parked overseas. Last year alone, the U.S. Treasury and state governments lost roughly $110 billion in tax revenues after major corporations funneled their cash through accounts in the Cayman Islands, Bermuda and other offshore tax havens, according to figures compiled by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG).

  • A national park classic: Hiking Zion's Narrows

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    Hiking The Narrows is, in a sense, both a macro and a micro sensory experience. You gaze up in awe at sculpted walls rising into a cobalt sky, the red rock streaked black in places where water briefly pours over them during a rain, and only the very tops of the cliffs kissed by sunshine. From that perspective, the scale humbles.

  • Why aren’t we all living the dream on Kauai?

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    Chefs and cowboys, chickens and mongooses, guitars and King Kong — they’ve all found new lives on Kauai, an island where the only constant is change. Of course there are the serene white beaches. But there’s an erratic beauty to the island that places Kauai in its own category.

  • Ted Nugent makes comment at NRA meeting about shooting Harry Reid

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    While speaking at a recent National Rifle Association event, rocker and NRA board member Ted Nugent said facetiously that if he had to accept Sen. Harry Reid’s help, he would shoot him afterward. 

  • Why Survival Rate Is Not the Best Way to Judge Cancer Spending

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    In 2012, a study published in Health Affairs argued that the big money we spend on health care in the United States is worth it, at least when it comes to cancer. The researchers found that the survival gains seen in the United States equated to more than $550 billion in additional value, more than the difference in spending. This research depended on survival rates. A new study was recently published in the same journal, but using mortality rates. That study found that cancer care in the United States might provide significantly less value than that in Western Europe.

  • Right-wing group blamed in leak of U.S. officials' home addresses: CBS

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    U.S. authorities are investigating the online leak of home addresses of senior officials and former officials from the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security and other agencies, CBS News reported on Wednesday. The Department of Homeland Security confirmed the leak but would not elaborate on who was affected or how many addresses had been leaked. DHS will adjust security measures, as appropriate, to protect our employees," said Homeland Security spokeswoman Marsha Catron.

  • Harry Reid on conservatives' mobster-beating theory: 'They don't like me as a person' | WashingtonExaminer.com

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, who recently announced plans to retire, rebutted conservative media speculation on Wednesday that his severe injuries are the result of a run-in with the mob. On CNBC's Speakeasy, host John Harwood asked Reid about theories put forth by conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh and Breitbart News that the injuries Reid sustained at the beginning of this year, including a blow to his right eye, are not, as he has said, the result of an accident involving elastic exercise equipment. The last few days, a bunch of people are saying, Reid, he didn't have an exercise accident, he got beat up by the mob, Harwood said. It shows the credibility of Rush Limbaugh, he's the guy that got all this started, Reid replied. Why in the world would I come up with a story that I got hurt in my own bathroom with my wife standing there? How could anyone say anything like that? And I think a lot of people, as I read, they kind of don't like me as a person and I think that's unfortunate.

  • Hillary Clinton's Father's Tombstone Knocked Over in Pennsylvania

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    The tombstone of Hillary Clinton’s father, Hugh Rodham,  was upturned  in what Pennsylvania police say may have been an act of political vandalism. “I’m not sure how else it would have fallen over,” Scranton Police Chief Carl Graziano told the Scranton Times-Tribune.

  • Putnam City elementary school evacuated by odor at school

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    A Putnam City elementary school was evacuated Wednesday morning over a Haz-Mat situation.

  • This Magic Moment - The Sopranos

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    Eight years after it aired, the finale of The Sopranos continues to be hotly debated. David Chase explains how he created the excruciating tension of the last scene. What he won’t say is what happened at the end.

  • Why The FDA Has Never Looked At Some Of The Additives In Our Food

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    In recent decades, the number of food additives has skyrocketed from about 800 to more than 10,000. A legal loophole in food safety law means companies can add them to foods with no government review.

  • What's the buzz? Colorado Springs AM station switches format from sports to marijuana

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    Listeners of KREL in Colorado Springs might have wondered if someone had spread cannabutter on their morning toast Monday when they tuned in and got marijuana programming instead of the radio station's usual sports news and talk shows. 

  • Seattle CEO to pay employees $70,000 minimum wage

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    The head of Gravity Payments will cut his $1 million salary and use a significant amount of the company's profits.

  • Look at how many pages are in the federal tax code

    Published: Wed, Apr 15, 2015

    As they rush to file their taxes by April 15, Americans are rightfully frustrated with the complexity of the 74,608-page-long federal tax code. The Washington Examiner says the federal tax code is 187 times longer than it was a century ago, according to Wolters Kluwer, CCH, which has analyzed the federal tax code since 1913. Amazingly, in the first 26 years of the federal income tax, the tax code only grew from 400 to 504 pages. Even through President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, the tax code was well under 1,000 pages. Changes during World War II made the length of the tax code balloon to 8,200 pages. Most of the growth in the tax code came in the past 30 years, growing from 26,300 pages in 1984 to nearly three times that length today.




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