• Monty Python star John Cleese will no longer perform at university campuses as political correctness kills comedy

    Published: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    John Cleese said he will no longer perform or give talks at university campuses because political correctness has taken over. The Monty Python star revealed that he has been advised not to perform to students as the fear of offending has expanded so far that any kind of criticism is now seen as "cruel". Mr Cleese said it is down to people who cannot control their emotions, so seek to control others, and worries that it could lead to a society like that in the iconic dystopian Orwell Novel.

  • Wife crashes her own funeral, horrifying her husband, who had paid to have her killed

    Published: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    Noela Rukundo sat in a car outside her home, watching as the last few mourners filed out. They were leaving a funeral — her funeral. Finally, she spotted the man she’d been waiting for. She stepped out of her car, and her husband put his hands on his head in horror. “Is it my eyes?” she recalled him saying. “Is it a ghost?” “Surprise! I’m still alive!” she replied.

  • German mayor says 10-year-olds shouldn’t ‘provoke’ sex attacks

    Published: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    A MAYOR in a small German town says primary school-aged girls should not “provoke” migrants to avoid being sexually assaulted. The comments came last week at a city council meeting in the eastern town of Bad Schlema, which has a population of 5500, with about 100 locals showed up to raise concerns about the town’s 85 refugees. The grandfather of a schoolgirl, aged “under 10”, asked Bad Schlema’s mayor, Jens Muller, what his plans were to prevent sexual assaults on children, who had already been harassed by newly arrived migrants on their way to school.

  • Smirking Shkreli refuses lawmakers' questions, calls them 'imbeciles'

    Published: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    Former drug executive Martin Shkreli smirked and brushed off questions about drug prices then tweeted that lawmakers were imbeciles on Thursday, when he appeared at a U.S. congressional hearing against his will. Shkreli, 32, sparked outrage last year among patients, medical societies and Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton after his company, Turing Pharmaceuticals, raised the price of the drug Daraprim by more than 5,000 percent to $750 a pill. The lifesaving medicine, used to treat a parasitic infection, once sold for $1 a pill and has been on the market for more than 60 years.

  • The FAA says it will shoot down your drone if you fly within 36 miles of the Super Bowl

    Published: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    The Federal Aviation Administration is taking a tough stance on drones at the Super Bowl this year: bring them, and we’ll shoot them down. The “no-drone-zone” spans much further than just the stadium itself too, extending out 36 miles from Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California. The no-fly zone encompasses nearly all of San Francisco to the north and west, Santa Cruz, Morgan Hill and Gilroy to the south, and San Jose and Pleasanton to the north and east. Flight restrictions are in place from 2:00 PM through 11:59 PM local time on Sunday, and violators could face fines and prosecution for disobeying the order, officials say. The FAA also warns that drones could be subject to “deadly force” if it is considered a threat – although they did not specify how and by whom the restrictions would be enforced.

  • Obama to propose $10-per-barrel fee on oil

    Published: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    President Barack Obama will propose a $10-per-barrel charge on oil to fund clean transportation projects as part of his final budget request next week, the White House said Thursday. The proposal — which follows the passage of a bipartisan transportation bill last year — would have difficulty clearing the Republican-controlled Congress. In a statement, Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana, House majority whip, said the House would quash the "absurd" plan. Oil companies would pay the fee, which would be gradually introduced over five years. The government would use the revenue to help fund high-speed railways, autonomous cars and other travel systems, aiming to reduce emissions from the nation's transportation system.

  • Justin.tv is making a comeback on Snapchat

    Published: Thu, Feb 4, 2016

    Justin.tv is back — kind of. Justin Kan, founder of the live streaming site Justin.tv that shuttered in 2014, announced on social media Wednesday that he is resurrecting his original "lifecasting" channel on his personal Snapchat account, Mashable reports.

  • Washington Examiner: Report: MS-13 foot soldiers use 'surge' to cross border, 'colonize new criminal territory'

    Published: Thu, Feb 4, 2016

    Criminal networks with Latin American roots, such as MS-13 and the 18th Street gang, are using the administration's open-door policy at the border to slip in recruits that are causing a huge spike in murder and violence throughout the nation, according to an immigration expert. Testifying Thursday at a House hearing on the border surge of young Latinos, the expert said, "Established gangs have been able to transfer an unknown number of experienced foot soldiers from Central America to help colonize new criminal territory in the United States." Jessica M. Vaughan, the policy director for the Center for Immigration Studies, told the House Judiciary Committee's Immigration and Border Security subcommittee that "the tide of new young people, many of whom have already been exposed or involved in street gangs at home, has provided a huge pool of new recruits for the gangs here. Gangs such as MS-13 and 18th Street are enjoying a brutal revival in certain parts of the country and are establishing themselves in new places."

  • Facebook deletes medical marijuana pages

    Published: Thu, Feb 4, 2016

    TRENTON — Medical marijuana is legal in 23 states including New Jersey, but the ubiquitous social media giant Facebook apparently doesn't "like" it. Home pages run by three Garden State dispensaries and at least handful of others across the country have been deleted. The surprise move stunned dispensary owners and angered patients, who said Wednesday they rely on the up-to-the-minute information these sites provide about the latest strains that help alleviate debilitating symptoms. "It seems high-handed to simply shut down important resources for sick patients without even saying why or giving organizations a way to ask for reconsideration," said Peter Rosenfeld, one of the 5,668 registered patients in the state program. "What better use of a social media than having sites where parents of sick children can ask questions about medication and treatments?"

  • Here's What Happened When Texas Cut off Planned Parenthood

    Published: Thu, Feb 4, 2016

    Women stopped using the most effective types of contraception and more babies were born on the government's tab after Texas cut off funding from Planned Parenthood clinics, a team of Texas researchers said Wednesday. The number of claims for long-acting contraception plummeted by more than a third and births paid for by Medicaid rose 27 percent, the team at the University of Texas at Austin reported. "This change is worrisome, since increased access to long-acting, reversible contraception methods is a priority of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and one study has indicated substantial unmet demand for long-acting, reversible contraception methods in Texas," they wrote in their report, published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

  • Food Stamps Still Feed One in Seven Americans Despite Recovery

    Published: Thu, Feb 4, 2016

    Wendee Crofoot lost her job as a fundraiser for a non-profit in 2011. After exhausting her savings and giving up her Mountain View, California, apartment she ended up working part-time as a restaurant cashier. The low pay qualified her for food stamps, so she signed up. “It wasn’t something I imagined would ever happen,” said Crofoot, 46. “There just weren’t any jobs.” During the 2007-2009 recession, state and federal governments actively encouraged people like Crofoot to take advantage of the aid. Millions did, and many are still claiming benefits. Enrollment in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, the formal name for food stamps, remains near record levels, even as the unemployment rate has fallen by half.

  • Yahoo Laying Off Staff And Considering Selling Itself

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Yahoo, the Internet pioneer, continues to lose money. Tuesday in its fourth-quarter report, the company said it had a loss of $4.4 billion, NPR reports. It's also laying off about 15 percent of its workforce and closing offices in five locations. Yahoo says it will explore "strategic alternatives" for its struggling Internet businesses including getting rid of services and assets that CEO Marissa Mayer has decided are not worth continued investment of time and money.

  • Babies With Genes From 3 People Could Be Ethical, Panel Says

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Would it be ethical for scientists to try to create babies that have genetic material from three different people? An influential panel of experts has concluded the answer could be yes, NPR reports. The 12-member panel, assembled by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, released a 164-page report Wednesday outlining a plan for how scientists could ethically pursue the controversial research.

  • Before 'Serial,' Two Women Set Out To Bring True Crime To Podcasts

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Maya (not her real name) opens the third episode of "Criminal" describing a guy she had a crush on as a student at NYU: tall, muscular, good at basketball. Despite their connection, Maya ignored her paramour's inconsistencies, which emerged the longer she knew him -- a jumped train turnstile here, a stolen projector there. "When you're infatuated with someone, you can convince yourself of a lot of things," host Phoebe Judge calmly narrates in between clips of Maya speaking.

  • Clock is ticking: Lottery winner could lose $63M

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Time is ticking. A California lottery winner could lose a $63 million dollar prize if they don’t claim their winnings by Thursday, USA TODAY reports.

  • Steven Avery's brother breaks media silence

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Steven Avery's brother Earl has given his first interview since the release of "Making a Murderer." He spoke with Stephanie Bauer of Access Hollywood after watching Friday's Dateline special but didn't have much to offer as far as new information — despite a few different outlets claiming he offered up "shocking new evidence," USA TODAY reports. Earl, like many viewers of the Netflix series, brought up the lack of blood evidence found at the scene. He also questioned how his brother would have been able to clean up his garage after a murder yet not remove dust that was "all over everything."

  • Where are you most likely to get kidnapped?

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Intensified civil conflicts in Africa, entrenched criminality in Latin America and the advance of Islamist militancy in spaces worldwide have contributed to “severe” kidnap ratings for 11 countries, up from eight in 2015. A further 11 countries, including India, Egypt, Lebanon, Cameroon and Kenya moved from “medium” to “high” – the latter four of these all face significant threats from Islamist militancy, according to  Global risk and crisis management consultancy NYA International who released it's annual kidnapping and piracy map today. 

  • Ryan asks conservatives: Don't revolt in 2016

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    House Speaker Paul Ryan kicked off a policy summit at the Heritage Foundation with a clear message for the conservatives who have been his allies over the years but made life hard for former Speaker John Boehner: Please don't revolt, at least not this year. "The Left would love nothing more, they would love nothing more than for a fragmented conservative movement to stand in a circular firing squad and fire so that progressives can win by default," Ryan said at the 2016 Conservative Policy Summit, hosted by Heritage Action. Ryan was warmly received at Heritage, but his call for unity included a mild rebuke for the conservatives who have hounded GOP leadership in recent years. He issued it while warning that conservatives may have to ignore some of President Obama's unilateral executive actions, which Ryan described as "distractions" designed to prevent the Republican party from uniting around a conservative agenda.

  • Retired cop files complaint against Philly cops

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    KEVIN BOOKER figures it was around 11:30 at night when someone started pounding on his front door, late enough to make him a little nervous. When he swung open the door to his Logan home on Jan. 8, no one was there. Booker shrugged it off, trudged back to bed, and went to sleep. An hour later, the pounding resumed. This time it was loud enough to wake his neighbors.

  • Washington Examiner: Woodward: Clinton 'shouts,' needs to 'get off this screaming stuff'

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Veteran investigative journalist Bod Woodward on Wednesday said a likely reason Hillary Clinton lost young voters in Iowa to her main Democratic rival is because she has a harsh tone that comes across as insecure. "I think a lot of it with Hillary Clinton has to do with style and delivery, oddly enough," Woodward said on MSNBC's "Morning Joe." "She shouts. There is something unrelaxed about the way she is communicating." Show co-host Joe Scarborough agreed.




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