• Before 'Serial,' Two Women Set Out To Bring True Crime To Podcasts

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Maya (not her real name) opens the third episode of "Criminal" describing a guy she had a crush on as a student at NYU: tall, muscular, good at basketball. Despite their connection, Maya ignored her paramour's inconsistencies, which emerged the longer she knew him -- a jumped train turnstile here, a stolen projector there. "When you're infatuated with someone, you can convince yourself of a lot of things," host Phoebe Judge calmly narrates in between clips of Maya speaking.

  • Clock is ticking: Lottery winner could lose $63M

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Time is ticking. A California lottery winner could lose a $63 million dollar prize if they don’t claim their winnings by Thursday, USA TODAY reports.

  • Steven Avery's brother breaks media silence

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Steven Avery's brother Earl has given his first interview since the release of "Making a Murderer." He spoke with Stephanie Bauer of Access Hollywood after watching Friday's Dateline special but didn't have much to offer as far as new information — despite a few different outlets claiming he offered up "shocking new evidence," USA TODAY reports. Earl, like many viewers of the Netflix series, brought up the lack of blood evidence found at the scene. He also questioned how his brother would have been able to clean up his garage after a murder yet not remove dust that was "all over everything."

  • Where are you most likely to get kidnapped?

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Intensified civil conflicts in Africa, entrenched criminality in Latin America and the advance of Islamist militancy in spaces worldwide have contributed to “severe” kidnap ratings for 11 countries, up from eight in 2015. A further 11 countries, including India, Egypt, Lebanon, Cameroon and Kenya moved from “medium” to “high” – the latter four of these all face significant threats from Islamist militancy, according to  Global risk and crisis management consultancy NYA International who released it's annual kidnapping and piracy map today. 

  • Ryan asks conservatives: Don't revolt in 2016

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    House Speaker Paul Ryan kicked off a policy summit at the Heritage Foundation with a clear message for the conservatives who have been his allies over the years but made life hard for former Speaker John Boehner: Please don't revolt, at least not this year. "The Left would love nothing more, they would love nothing more than for a fragmented conservative movement to stand in a circular firing squad and fire so that progressives can win by default," Ryan said at the 2016 Conservative Policy Summit, hosted by Heritage Action. Ryan was warmly received at Heritage, but his call for unity included a mild rebuke for the conservatives who have hounded GOP leadership in recent years. He issued it while warning that conservatives may have to ignore some of President Obama's unilateral executive actions, which Ryan described as "distractions" designed to prevent the Republican party from uniting around a conservative agenda.

  • Retired cop files complaint against Philly cops

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    KEVIN BOOKER figures it was around 11:30 at night when someone started pounding on his front door, late enough to make him a little nervous. When he swung open the door to his Logan home on Jan. 8, no one was there. Booker shrugged it off, trudged back to bed, and went to sleep. An hour later, the pounding resumed. This time it was loud enough to wake his neighbors.

  • Washington Examiner: Woodward: Clinton 'shouts,' needs to 'get off this screaming stuff'

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Veteran investigative journalist Bod Woodward on Wednesday said a likely reason Hillary Clinton lost young voters in Iowa to her main Democratic rival is because she has a harsh tone that comes across as insecure. "I think a lot of it with Hillary Clinton has to do with style and delivery, oddly enough," Woodward said on MSNBC's "Morning Joe." "She shouts. There is something unrelaxed about the way she is communicating." Show co-host Joe Scarborough agreed.

  • Girl, 11, testifies dad beat her with frozen bacon, quoted Bible

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    BAY CITY, MI — Despite a few moments of crying, an 11-year-old girl remained mostly composed, testifying in a clear and confident manner that her dad beat her with frozen bacon and then quoted the Bible as the assault went on. The girl testified during the preliminary examination of Jonathan A. Powell, 45, held the afternoon of Tuesday, Feb. 2. Powell is charged with one count of third-degree child abuse, punishable by up to two years in prison. The girl testified she alternates staying with her mother and father. She testified she and her younger sister went to stay at her dad's Hampton Township home for the weekend on Friday, Jan. 8.

  • American Students Know Almost Nothing About Their College Loans

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    Handing an 18-year-old a loan for tens of thousands of dollars to get a college degree comes with many risks. One is that the borrower may not understand anything about the contract being signed. A new study suggests that young people with education debt don't know the most basic facts about their loans. The survey, conducted in January by Lendedu, a company that provides information about loan refinancing options, adds to a growing body of research into the widespread ignorance among young people about debt that could follow them to their graves. When Lendedu talked to 477 undergraduate and graduate students at three Bay Area campuses, it found that just 6 percent of them knew how long they would be repaying the debt. Only 8 percent knew the interest rate on their loan. (That could explain why loan collectors, such as Nelnet, need to broadcast on Twitter that federal loan interest rates are set by the government.)

  • Arrested Oregon militiamen have had extensive previous run-ins with the law

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    The arrested militiamen of the Oregon refuge occupation have had extensive previous run-ins with the law – and a history of anti-government protests that federal officials are now using against them in court. In recent filings in federal court in Portland, prosecutors have detailed the criminal histories of the 11 people facing felony charges for their involvement in the armed occupation of the Malheur national wildlife refuge, which began 2 January and continues to drag on this week with no end in sight. The men’s rap sheets include cases of domestic violence, illegal firearm possession, terrorist threats, resisting arrest and drug crimes, according to the court records.

  • Ohio CVS stores will start selling life-saving heroin antidote over the counter

    Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    COLUMBUS (WCMH)–The life-saving drug naloxone (Narcan) will no longer require a prescription at Ohio CVS locations starting next month. The drug has been used by first responders to revive heroin or opiate overdose victims.  Loved ones of heroin users previously had to obtain a prescription from a doctor. AIDS Resource Center Ohio was one of the first central Ohio pharmacies to sell the drug without a prescription. They have sold more than 80 doses since September of 2015. AIDS Resource Center Ohio Chief Operating Officer Peggy Anderson says, “If we lose them to an overdose then we have lost an opportunity to have a productive life in the future.”

  • White House To Request $1 Billion For Cancer 'Moonshot'

    Published: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    President Obama plans to ask Congress for $755 million in cancer-research funding as part of his 2017 budget, according to the White House. That would bring the funding total to nearly $1 billion over the next two years to accelerate what the president called a "moonshot" to try to eliminate cancer, NPR reports. Congress has already approved $195 million in research funding in 2016.

  • Florida Supreme Court To Decide Whether Executions Can Go Forward

    Published: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    Florida's highest court on Tuesday will hear a case that may determine the fate of some 390 people on the state's death row. Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Florida's system for imposing the death penalty is unconstitutional, NPR reports. Florida has an execution set for next week. The state's highest court now must decide whether it can go forward.

  • Hillary Clinton wins Iowa caucuses

    Published: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    Hillary Clinton has won the Iowa Democratic caucuses, according to final results from the Iowa Democratic Party. CNN reports she just edges Bernie Sanders in the total of state delegate equivalents awarded Monday night.

  • Police: Dallas teens forced 15-year-old girl to have sex with 6 men per day for 2 weeks

    Published: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    Two Dallas men have been charged with a slew of sexual assault offenses after allegedly holding and prostituting a 15-year-old girl against her will. Dallas police officers arrested Mike Osorio and Rafael Rodas, both 19 years old, after the female escaped and ran to authorities, according to a press conference aired on the police department’s website. Dallas police Deputy Chief Rob Sherwin said the two men and the girl first contacted each other on Facebook, when they decided to meet at a location.

  • UConn officials explain thinking behind African American male-only section of dorm

    Published: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    STORRS-- A living space under construction on the University of Connecticut's campus is also under fire. It will be called SCHOLA2RS House, and is a UConn learning community meant specifically for African American males. SCHOLA2RS House--which stands for scholastic house of leaders who are African American researchers and scholars--is set to be housed inside NextGen Hall, which is scheduled to open in fall 2016. Here is the description from UConn's website: Uconn ScHOLA2RS House is a scholastic initiative to groom, nurture, and train the next generation of leaders to address grand challenges in society through the promotion of academic success in undergraduate programs at the University of Connecticut and in competitive graduate programs.

  • US veteran’s children taken away over his use of medical marijuana

    Published: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    When Raymond Schwab talks about his case, his voice teeters between anger and sadness. “People who don’t understand the medical value of cannabis are tearing my family apart,” says the Kansas father and US veteran, who has a prescription for marijuana in neighboring Colorado, where it is legal. Nine months ago, Schwab tried to move to Colorado to grow medical marijuana for fellow veterans. While he and his wife were there preparing for the move, the state of Kansas took five of their children, ages 5 to 16, into custody on suspicion of child endangerment, ensnaring his family in interstate marijuana politics.

  • Google passes Apple as biggest firm after hours

    Published: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    Google parent Alphabet was set to pass Apple as the most valuable company in the world on Tuesday. At Monday's after-hours levels (which technically reflect an indication, but not the real-world value), Alphabet's market cap would roughly be $570 billion, eclipsing Apple's current market cap of about $535 billion. The last time Google was more valuable than Apple was in February 2010, when both companies were worth less than $200 billion. At the time, Apple had yet to release its first iPad, the newest iPhone on the market was the 3GS, and the Mac was the company's biggest product line, accounting for one-third of revenue. Steve Jobs was still at the helm. Google was being guided by Eric Schmidt, who would hand control back to co-founder Larry Page the following year. The company was a little more than half its current size.

  • Nestlé admits slavery in Thailand while fighting child labour lawsuit in Ivory Coast

    Published: Mon, Feb 1, 2016

    It’s hard to think of an issue that you would less like your company to be associated with than modern slavery. Yet last November Nestlé, the world’s largest foodmaker and one of the most recognisable household brands, went public with the news it had found forced labour in its supply chains in Thailand and that its customers were buying products tainted with the blood and sweat of poor, unpaid and abused migrant workers. By independently disclosing that Nestlé customers had unwittingly bought products contaminated by the very worst labour abuses, the company said it was moving into a new era of self-policing of its own supply chains. A year-long investigation by the company confirmed media reports that the seafood industry in Thailand is riddled with forced labour and human trafficking and that slave labour was involved in the production of its Fancy Feast catfood brand. Nestlé also made sure to make it clear that no other company sourcing seafood from Thailand, the world’s third-largest seafood exporter, could have avoided being exposed to the same risks.

  • Washington Examiner: BOOM: Historic 11-point voter intensity gap favors Republicans

    Published: Mon, Feb 1, 2016

    Republican voters are far more gung ho to vote in the fall presidential election than Democrats, a sign that two terms of Democratic ownership of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. may be at an end. Longtime GOP strategist and pollster Ed Goeas told Secrets that the eagerness for Election Day is driven by one thing: Republicans want President Obama and his supporters out of the White House. A new survey his company, the Tarrance Group, conducted for the centrist Republican Ripon Society uncovered an 11-point "intensity" gap among white Republicans and white Democrats.




Advertisement