• Of Character: Oklahoma musician helps raise funds, students' spirits

    By Nathan Poppe Entertainment Writer npoppe@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    Blake Parks, 27, decided to lend a hand with the inaugural effort of Music To Your Peers. He returned to his alma mater, Duncan High School, in November with his rock band Nicnos for a fundraising effort and motivational talk.

  • Metro church, Tim Tebow Foundation offers prom-night experience for special needs individuals

    By Carla Hinton Religion Editor chinton@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    The Rev. Bill Hulse, Putnam City Baptist's senior pastor, said the "Night to Shine," festivities drew an estimated crowd of more than 1,000 people, including guests, their guardians and hundreds of community volunteers.

  • OK Capitol Boxscore

    By RICK M. GREEN Capitol Bureau rmgreen@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    Rick M. Green: OK Capitol Boxscore is a weekly look at what's happening at the Oklahoma state Capitol in Oklahoma City.

  • Taking Stock: Odds are stacked against achieving a financially comfortable retirement

    Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    Malcolm Berko: Please note that only 0.91 percent of a given population number will have the skill sets and ambition to retire wealthy.

  • Business of Health: Physicians who are sued less are those who build rapport with their patients

    By Stephen Prescott | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    Dr. Stephen Prescott, M.D.: A Medscape survey of nearly 4,000 physicians found that 59 percent had been named as defendants in at least one medical malpractice suit.

  • Bethany settles lawsuit with former suspect in Carina Saunders slaying

    BY JENNIFER PALMER Staff Writer jpalmer@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    Luis Enrique Ruiz, 41, sued the city of Bethany, Oklahoma, and police investigators after spending more than seven months in jail in the 2011 death of Carina Saunders, 19, whose dismembered body was found in a duffel bag behind a grocery store.

  • Oklahoma City consultant encourages leaders to focus on workers' good results

    By Paula Burkes Business Writer pburkes@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    Nathan Mellor, the chief executive of Strata Leadership and Principal Technologies staffing firm spoke at an Oklahoma Business Ethics Consortium luncheon at the Oklahoma City Petroleum Club.

  • Oklahoma County jail report draws praise from task force members

    By Randy Ellis Staff Writer rellis@oklahoman.com   | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    Oklahoma County Public Defender Bob Ravitz said the initial report of the Vera Institute of Justice on the Oklahoma County jail was on point when it talked about how the stacking of fees, fines and bail amounts have overwhelmed indigent offenders and resulted in an overcrowded jail.

  • Scholarship match program adds up to more money for college students

    By K.S. McNutt Staff Writer kmcnutt@oklahoman.com | Updated: 17 hr ago

    Now is the time for college-bound students to apply for the many scholarships administered by the Oklahoma City Community Foundation. More money will be available for awards this year following a successful 2015 scholarship match campaign that added $771,576 to 82 scholarship endowment funds, foundation officials said.  But students won't get a penny if they don't apply, said Megan Hornbeek, scholarship funds coordinator. More than 2,100 students have started the application process, but many haven't finished. "Take 30 minutes to sit down and write that essay," Hornbeek tells students. The one hour it takes to apply could pay off with a $2,000 scholarship. "That's good pay for one hour's work," she said.

  • Open-source textbooks gain in push for college affordability

    By MICHAEL MELIA Associated Press | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    STORRS, Conn. — The standard textbook for Fundamentals of General Chemistry I at the University of Connecticut has a list price of $303. For students who use the version professor Edward Neth is preparing for the fall semester, the cost will be zero. An early adopter of open-source textbooks, Neth said he turned to the new technology out of frustration with spiraling prices of commercial textbooks. “It's seeing the costs go up every semester and almost feeling powerless,” Neth said. Universities and state governments are lining up behind the cause as a way to make college more affordable.

  • Education notes

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    Fallin appoints Callahan as OSU and A&M regent Gov. Mary Fallin has appointed Jarold Callahan, of Edmond, to serve as a regent for Oklahoma State University and the A&M Colleges. He will replace Andy Lester, who resigned after being appointed to the Oklahoma Regents for Higher Education. If the appointment is confirmed by the Senate, Callahan will join the board on May 17 and will serve the remainder of Lester's term, which expires in 2018. “Jarold is a lifelong rancher with experience in education at the university level, so he will be a valuable addition to the Board of Regents for Oklahoma A&M Colleges,” Fallin said in her announcement. Callahan is president of Express Ranches, a commercial ranching

  • Bethany settles case with former suspect in Carina Saunders slaying

    BY JENNIFER PALMER Staff Writer jpalmer@oklahoman.com | Updated: 12 hr ago

    BETHANY — City officials have settled a lawsuit for $50,000 with one of the former suspects in the brutal torture killing of a young Mustang woman.  Luis Enrique Ruiz, 41, received the settlement last month. He sued the city of Bethany and police investigators after spending more than seven months in jail after the 2011 death of Carina Saunders, 19, whose dismembered body was found in a duffel bag behind a grocery store. Ruiz, along with Jimmy Massey, were charged in 2012 with first-degree murder in Saunders' slaying, but the case fell apart due to a flawed investigation. Prosecutors dismissed the charges due to insufficient evidence. Ruiz's lawsuit alleged civil rights violations including false arrest and

  • How much oil does Oklahoma produce?

    By Adam Wilmoth Energy Editor awilmoth@oklahoman.com | Yesterday

    Energy companies in Oklahoma have produced about 100,000 barrels of oil per day more than previously reported over the past year, according to a new survey released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The new numbers boost oil production in the state 25 to 30 percent. "The data coming out of the tax commission are not easy to interpret at this point," Stephen J. Harvey, assistant administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Statistics, said this month during an interview at The Oklahoman. "We just had to decide whether we believe ours or theirs.

  • Health notes

    From Staff Reports | Updated: 17 hr ago

    Flu cases remain low in Oklahoma No Oklahomans have died from influenza-related complications since the start of this year's flu season in October, and flu activity remains low throughout the state, according to state Health Department data. Since October, 126 Oklahomans, including 50 residents age 65 or older, have been hospitalized because of flu-related complications. At this time last year, 82 Oklahomans had died as a result of flu-related complications, the highest number of flu deaths the state had seen since the health department started tracking such statistics in 2009. Additionally, at this time last year, more than 1,600 residents had been hospitalized because of the flu.

  • Texas A&M president decries reports of racial harassment

    By The Associated Press | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Texas A&M University is still trying to determine which students may have shouted a racial slur and referenced the Confederate flag to a group of black and Latino high school students touring the campus. About 60 students from a southwest Dallas charter school reported they were taunted by students on campus during a visit Tuesday. Two black high school students said they were approached by a white A&M student wearing Confederate flag earrings, state Sen. Royce West said Thursday. Others in the tour group said they heard white A&M students telling them to "Go back where you came from," and using an anti-black slur, said West, who said he was contacted by university officials.

  • How much oil does Oklahoma produce?

    By Adam Wilmoth Energy Editor awilmoth@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration has determined that Oklahoma is under-reporting the amount of oil produced each year.

  • Physicians who are sued less are those who build rapport with their patients

    By Dr. Stephen Prescott For The Oklahoman | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    I have never been sued. As a doctor, that puts me in the minority. In December, a Medscape survey of nearly 4,000 physicians found that 59 percent had been named as defendants in at least one medical malpractice suit. That number lines up with a 2010 American Medical Association survey, which put the chances of getting sued at 61 percent by late career. My own ability to avoid the wrath of the litigation gods probably has more to do with career path than talent: As a medical researcher, I haven't been in clinic for almost four decades. And when your “patients” are test tubes full of cells, your odds of getting on the wrong end of a malpractice suit diminish significantly.

  • In Brief

    From Staff Reports | Updated: 12 hr ago

    Joesef Dewayne Till, 25, of Fort Towson, died Friday after a wreck in Choctaw County, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol said.

  • 'Chip' in

    By Jason Kersey Staff Writer jkersey@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    Mike Stoops and Tim Kish spent a good chunk of 2006 trying to convince an undersized, overachieving cornerback from Fresno, Calif., to come to Arizona. That cornerback became UCLA's defensive scout team player of the year as a true freshman by frustrating offensive coordinator Jay Norvell's receivers in practice. That same cornerback transferred to New Mexico State for his final season, where one November night he swatted down a fourth-down pass to a Fresno State receiver named Jalen Saunders, sealing New Mexico State's historic win. Fast forward to the fall of 2012, and Mike Stoops was back recruiting in Fresno when he noticed a familiar face running junior varsity players through drills.

  • What they’re saying about Chip Viney

    By Jason Kersey | Published: Sun, Feb 14, 2016

    In reporting a profile of Chip Viney, The Oklahoman contacted several players and coaches who know Viney well. Here's a sampling of what those individuals had to say about the 26-year-old. Former OU and current Jacksonville Jaguars cornerback Aaron Colvin: “I look forward to seeing him skyrocket in the coaching world. His dedication and his hard work are gonna take him a long way. You guys will see him doing big things here soon.” Former OU defensive back Kass Everett: “What I did notice is that the coaches trusted him a lot to do things that I didn't normally see from the GAs. They gave him trust in running DB drills.” Former OU safety Gabe Lynn: “From the first day he got out there, he had so much energy on




Advertisement