Matt Patterson
Local News Reporter

Matt Patterson has been with The Oklahoman since 2006. Prior to joining the news staff in 2010, Patterson worked in The Oklahoman's sports department for five years. He previously worked at The Lawton Constitution and The Edmond Sun.



Patterson attended Jenks High School and The University of Oklahoma majoring in History. He and his wife, Krisan, were married in 2004 and live in Oklahoma City with their two dogs and one evil cat. When not working, Matt enjoys spending time outdoors and following his beloved New England Patriots.


  • Civil Air Patrol cadets in Edmond are earning their wings

    Civil Air Patrol cadets in Edmond are earning...

    By Matt Patterson Staff Writer mpatterson@oklahoman.com | Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    The Edmond Composite Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol is an official U.S. Air Force civilian auxiliary with three key missions: search and rescue, disaster relief and aerospace education for America’s youth.

  • Troubled KC-46 could face more delays

    Troubled KC-46 could face more delays

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    The KC-46A aerial refueling tanker could be facing more problems as Boeing races to deliver the troubled aircraft to the Air Force late next year. Aviation Week reports that a delay of up to six months could be on the horizon thanks to technical problems and issues with the supply chain. The KC-46 will have a presence in Oklahoma when it is finally delivered. There will be a maintenance facility at Tinker Air Force Base and Altus Air Force Base will serve as a training center for its crew.  The first 15 tankers had been slated to be delivered in Aug. 2017. The latest delay could ignite renewed debate in congress about the project's funding, the publication reports.

  • A look at Allegiant's new OKC service

    A look at Allegiant\'s new OKC service

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Thu, May 26, 2016

    The beaches of Destin  will be within easy reach to Oklahoma City based travelers as Allegiant Air adds nonstop service from Will Rogers beginning Thursday. The seasonal service is the first non-stop flight to that part of Florida from Oklahoma City. There will be two weekly flights via the Destin-Fort Walton Beach Airport. That's the good news. The other news is Allegiant is a low-cost carrier. If you travel light, these airlines are your best friend. If you over pack, or like to know where you're going to sit on the plane, or want to be among the first to board, and don't want to pay for those up-charges, you might be disappointed. The base fares are outstanding.

  • Wayback Wednesday: No Luke or Leia for Oklahoma City

    Wayback Wednesday: No Luke or Leia for Oklahoma...

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Wed, May 25, 2016

    If you know someone who claims to have seen Star Wars in Oklahoma City on May 25, 1977, the day it opened, their memory is dodgy or they're telling a fib. Sort of like the 20 million people who claimed to have been at Woodstock. Star Wars may have "opened" on May 25 but it  did so in less than 40 theaters around the country, most of which were on the east and west coasts. If you opened your copy of The Daily Oklahoman that day in 1977 you would have found films like "The Car that Eats People" and "Demon Seed" playing at Southpark Cinema. "Sentinel" and "Sparkle" were playing at the Tower Theater on NW 23. It's not that there were no good movies to see. Paul Newman's "Slapshot" was

  • TSA woes could lead to more line delays at OKC airport

    TSA woes could lead to more line delays at OKC...

    By Matt Patterson Staff Writer mpatterson@oklahoman.com | Published: Tue, May 24, 2016

    At airports across the country, the Transportation Security Administration checkpoint process is taking longer — sometimes much, much longer — and Oklahoma City is not immune.

  • Lines could be long at Will Rogers for Memorial Day weekend

    Lines could be long at Will Rogers for Memorial...

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Tue, May 24, 2016

    Budget cuts have helped to create long lines at airports around the country, and normally tranquil Will Rogers World Airport could soon find itself in the mix. The airport and TSA held a media event Tuesday to highlight some of the ways travelers can cut down on their time going through the screening process. Airport spokeswoman Karen Carney said travelers should plan to arrive at least 90 minutes early for flights. Carney said the airport has seen longer lines in recent months since the budget cuts have taken effect. Lines as long as 30-40 minutes were present during the peak spring break travel times.

  • Oklahoma's oil downturn cripples area nonprofits

    Oklahoma\'s oil downturn cripples area nonprofits

    By Matt Patterson Staff Writer mpatterson@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, May 22, 2016

    Lesa Thompson may soon lose her job at the Oklahoma Department of Human Services, prompted by a downturn in the oil patch that is placing an unusually heavy strain on Oklahoma social service agencies, nonprofits and other groups that seek to aid those in need.

  • A history of Oklahoma bridge problems and incidents

    A history of Oklahoma bridge problems and...

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Thu, May 19, 2016

    A section of the May Avenue bridge across Northwest Expressway collapsed Thursday afternoon. Fortunately there were no injuries. But Oklahoma has a history of bridge-related problems. Some have even resulted in deaths. Here's a look back at some of the state's more noteworthy bridge problems and incidents. The Interstate 40 collapse (2002) A section of the Interstate 40 bridge near Webbers Falls collapsed after it was struck by a barge on May 26, 2002. The accident killed 14 people, many of whom died when their cars plunged off the damaged bridge into the river.

  • Have you been hurt by state budget cuts or the economy?

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Thu, May 19, 2016

    We're currently working on a story for the paper about how state budget cuts and the downturn in Oklahoma's energy economy has impacted non-profits such as the Salvation Army and United Way. If you have been impacted and are willing to speak about your experience on the record, please call 475-3359 or email me at mpatterson@oklahoman.com.

  • Wayback Wednesday: St. Helens goes boom

    Wayback Wednesday: St. Helens goes boom

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Wed, May 18, 2016

    The warnings from the USGS had been steadily coming since 1980 when a series of earthquakes began around the Mount St. Helens area. The pressure building up inside the volcano was going to cut itself loose at some point, and the results were not going to be pretty. The question was when. Some believed it was imminent. Skeptics believed it could be a hundred years. One man who operated under that assumption was Harry Truman (not that one). This Truman owned a lodge on the mountain and, despite repeated warnings and requests for him to leave, he decided to stay. Truman had lived on the mountain for nearly a half century and he wasn't about to leave because some scientists told him to. "If the mountain

  • Experts hope to get mosquitoes to bug off this summer

    By Matt Patterson Staff Writer mpatterson@oklahoman.com | Published: Mon, May 16, 2016

    As the supervisor of the Oklahoma City Water Department’s environmental unit, Derek Johnson works to kill as many mosquitoes as possible before they take flight and ruin your lazy summer evenings on the patio or, worse yet, infect you with the West Nile virus.

  • Survey says: Europe still a hot travel destination

    Survey says: Europe still a hot travel destination

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Thu, May 12, 2016

    My inbox typically runneth over with pitches from various PR entities whether it's the latest hot product or the opening of a new fast food chain location, we get them all. Along those lines Travel Leaders Group just released their survey of more than 3,400 American travelers on where they intend to go this year, or whether or not their travel plans were altered by terrorism. The key findings: - For those with European travel plans, France was the top country followed by Italy, the UK, Germany and Spain. - For those who were not planning a European vacation this year, safety concerns rank among the top five reasons with 25 percent of respondents listing that as a primary concern.

  • Electrical fire closes Oklahoma City YMCA

    Electrical fire closes Oklahoma City YMCA

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Thu, May 12, 2016

    The Rockwell Plaza YMCA is closed after an electrical fire caused damage to the building at 8300 Glade Avenue in northwest Oklahoma City. The YMCA posted the announcement on its Facebook page Wednesday night: "The Rockwell Plaza YMCA will be closed until further notice due to an electrical fire. We will begin making repairs tomorrow, but it could be the middle of next week before they are complete. More details soon.

  • Nine Mile offers different view of Jamaica

    Nine Mile offers different view of Jamaica

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Fri, May 6, 2016

    When people go to Jamaica they're usually headed for its sandy beaches, or  to take a walk up the ultra touristy Dunn's River Falls. Or to sip some of Jamaica's Blue Mountain Coffee. Or maybe all of the above. What most people don't do is head into the hinterlands. Two hours from Montego Bay, nestled in the mountains is Nine Mile, a small village in Saint Ann's Parish. This is the birth place, and final resting place of Bob Marley who died on this day in 1982. The compound which includes a small bar, a gift shop selling Marley stuff, a small abode Marley lived in and the church like building that contains his crypt, is owned by the Marley family. Visitors can see his crypt and view exhibits dedicated to

  • Wayback Wednesday: "Dusty Old Dust"

    Wayback Wednesday:

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Fri, May 6, 2016

    The May 11, 1934 edition The Daily Oklahoman gave little indication of the plague that was to come. A small item on the front page story about the state’s wheat harvest being below normal. Another mentioned a storm that dumped an inch of rain in western Oklahoma that might alleviate the dust in the air. A  November 1933 in the Dakotas provided what would be the preview of the years ahead. Just six months later, May 9, 1934 a dust storm kicked up. It would last two days and when it was over it had swept more than 12 million pounds of dust eastward, as far as Washington DC.  This was the end of the beginning for what would become the Dust Bowl. Times were already tough.

  • Living History Days coming to Kingfisher

    Living History Days coming to Kingfisher

    By Matt Patterson Staff Writer mpatterson@oklahoman.com   | Published: Wed, May 11, 2016

    History will come alive on the streets of Kingfisher during Living History Days, set for Friday and Saturday at Chisholm Trail Museum.

  • Oklahoma City Animal Shelter cares for more than cats and dogs

    Oklahoma City Animal Shelter cares for more...

    By Matt Patterson Staff Writer mpatterson@oklahoman.com | Updated: Tue, May 10, 2016

    On any given day, a barn on the backside of Oklahoma City Animal Shelter at 2811 SE 29, might hold a monkey, an alligator or a slightly ill-tempered alpaca. Or maybe 40 head of cattle.

  • Zoo gorilla gets a root canal

    Zoo gorilla gets a root canal

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Mon, May 9, 2016

    Tatu, an Oklahoma City Zoo Western lowlands gorilla that had been ailing recently, underwent a lengthy dental procedure Sunday, zoo spokeswoman Candice Rennels said. A root canal was performed on a cracked canine and  two molars were extracted with the help of Oklahoma City dentist Colin Holman. The 41-year-old gorilla had been eating less and had been less active in recent weeks. While under sedation a heart ultrasound was also performed on Tatu, Rennels said.

  • Oklahoma City Zoo staff evaluates popular gorilla for age-related health problems

    Oklahoma City Zoo staff evaluates popular...

    By Matt Patterson Staff Writer mpatterson@oklahoman.com | Published: Fri, May 6, 2016

    Tatu, a 41-year-old western lowland gorilla at the Oklahoma City Zoo, hasn't been eating consistently and has been lethargic. Zoo staff evaluated him and think he may be suffering from a respiratory infection.

  • Popular gorilla suffering from possible respiratory infection

    Popular  gorilla suffering from possible...

    Matt Patterson | Updated: Thu, May 5, 2016

    Tatu, a popular western lowland gorilla at the Oklahoma City Zoo is being evaluated for what might be an upper respiratory infection, zoo veterinarian Jennifer D'Agostino said. The 41-year-old gorilla has been showing signs of lethargic behavior over the past week and had developed a slight cough which has concerned his caretakers. Tatu was immobilized Thursday and a full medical exam was conducted to determine what is causing the behavior. Western lowland gorillas have a life expectancy of about 31 years and are critically endangered in the wild. Since his arrival to the Zoo in 1983 at the age of eight, Tatu has become a favorite of visitors.





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